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What Not to Pack When Moving

If you are planning to move, you may be overwhelmed with a lengthy to-do list. Pulling up roots in one community and relocating to another means changing relationships, neighborhoods, schools, and perhaps even a new job.

One of those major tasks on your list is packing. Whether you are downsizing, upsizing or starting a new life cross-country, you have a lot to consider when it comes to what items you will take with you.

To reduce the stress on yourself and your family, it is recommended you start packing early. This may seem like it will extend the process even longer, but in fact, starting early gives you time to think about what you plan to pack, sell, give away or throw out. Another tip: leave yourself a “sanctuary” that is packed last, so you can retain the creature comforts that help you get through your day-to-day life.

While you want to make the moving process as easy as possible, you must also take into account some important regulations. Movers cannot transport certain items due to their hazardous nature. In addition, some items are too precious to risk putting on the moving van lest they get lost. Here’s a bit of an idea of what not to pack when moving and how else you can handle them.

Dangerous or Flammable Goods

If you want to bring anything that is flammable, potentially explosive or corrosive, you may be out of luck. Movers are prohibited from transporting such materials because of their hazardous nature.

While some of the items that fall into this category are expected by most people, others may surprise you. As a rule of thumb, it is best to ask your moving company well in advance for a list of items for which you need to make other arrangements. Here are a few common examples:

  • Paint and paint thinners
  • Household chemicals
  • Automotive maintenance chemicals
  • Nail polish remover
  • Gasoline
  • Matches
  • Propane tanks and cylinders
  • Radio-pharmaceuticals (radioactive drugs)
  • Firearms
  • Fireworks

If you have these items, you have many options. Your neighbor may appreciate a gift of a spare tank of gas or extra cans of paint. Many of these dangerous items, although they cannot be moved, often are acceptable to pass on to others.

Contact your municipal waste or recycling council for tips on how to dispose of any chemicals or hazardous items. Often, there are strict rules around disposal and a specific methodology for doing so.

Perishable Food

here is another tough fact about moving: it takes a while! Even when everything runs smoothly, most people need several hours to load the truck, drive to the new home and unload the belongings. The sad truth is that perishable food will not last without spoiling. In the event of spillage, it can also damage your other household items.

Instead of planning to take the food with you, have a goodbye meal with what is left in your fridge. Give the excess to neighbors or, if possible, the local food bank. If you need to throw out any perishable food, check with your city about organic waste programs, especially if you cannot put food in with your regular garbage.

Plants and Flowers

Your favorite houseplant may not be a hazardous good, but many regions still have rules about what can cross state lines. This is a great question to ask your mover: can you trust your beloved rubber plant to go in the truck? Depending on where you are going and the projected length of the move, the movers may or may not recommend that you make other arrangements for your green-leafed items.

Personal Items for Health and Safety

During the move, you will not be able to pop in to retrieve an important item at a moment’s notice. Make a list of those things you must have on hand, especially in the event of traffic delays or other unexpected events. These may include medications, changes of clothing, toiletries and comfort items for small children.

Valuables and Heirlooms

Most moving companies are reputable and take great care of your household items. However, they do not want to put your precious valuables at risk any more than you do. Since you will not be riding in the moving van along with your packed boxes, consider whether you can take some items with you. Among these precious items you may want to keep safely are:

  • Jewelry
  • Cash
  • Collections
  • Personal papers
  • Identification and moving documents
  • Family photos

If you are not sure what you need to keep near you, ask yourself if an item is replaceable. If it is not, do not pack it, regardless of the trust you have in your moving team to get the job done efficiently.

Contact Us!

In any moving experience, unexpected issues arise.  If you are not sure about a particular item, just ask us. We can help make your moving day is as stress-free as possible. Give us a call at 1-800-233-MOVE or email [email protected]

Picking a Moving Date That’s Right For Your Needs

Deciding when you’re going to move is stressful. There are so many factors to consider to come up with the perfect date and you want to make your move as easy as you can on everyone involved. With a move already putting a strain on your everyday life, it is important to pick the perfect moving day that suits all of your needs.

Here’s what you need to consider:

If You Have Kids

If you have kids you’ll want to consider when is best for them. Most kids find it more difficult to move in the middle of the school year because curriculums are unlikely to line up at both schools. The stress of starting school in the middle of the year with no friends can often be overwhelming and result in a lot of stress and low grades. Because of this, it is a good idea to move during the summer.

You may be eager to get going right after your child completes a grade but it is likely they don’t feel the same way. Give them a week or two to say goodbye to all their friends, in and out of the neighborhood, and to allow them to adapt to the idea of moving. If you want to move at the end of the summer, be sure that it is a few weeks before school starts back up for your kid. Give them some time to get acquainted with the new house and the people in the neighborhood before throwing them back into school.

Unfortunately, the almost universal desire to avoid breaking up a school year leads most families to prefer to pick a moving date during summer break, and this means…

 

If You’re Worried About Cost

The summer is the most costly time of the year to move because it’s the busiest. With most people moving in late May to early October, and the absolute busiest days at the end of June and July, the rush of people hiring moving trucks in the summer results in higher rates. There’s only so many moving companies and vehicles to hire and the demand pushes up prices.

The weekends are also an expensive time to move with most people trying to make the switch when they aren’t working. It is best to avoid the holidays when it comes to moving because any time off will result in an influx of people trying to hire companies. The most cost effective time of the year is likely to be late fall before Christmas and Hannukah and winter.

Don’t wait until the last minute to hire your moving company. If you really need a specific day, you are going to want to hire them weeks ahead of time to ensure that you get the day and the company you want.

 

If You’re Renting

Most people try to rent during spring and summer. This is when people get off of work and out of school so you have many college students leaving their apartments. This means that there will be a lot on the market during these busy months so you will have the most options.

However, with so many people looking for a place, it gives you less time to decide if you really want to rent. You will likely not have the time to negotiate a lower price so renting in the spring and summer will be the most expensive.

The winter can be a very good time to rent because fewer people have a desire to move in the cold. Renters will be eager to get their places under contract and therefore will be much more likely to negotiate a lower cost.

 

If You’re Worried About The Weather

The weather is a very big factor when considering when you want to move. If you don’t want to get caught in the rain or snow or are incredibly opposed to moving in the cold, then you will want to schedule your move for summer. If you have wooden or even some plastic items that are very important to you, special preparations may be needed to protect them from the elements.

Moving somewhere cold to somewhere warm and vice versa can damage some of your belongings if the temperature changes are very extreme, so consider a summer moving date when temperatures are more forgiving might be a good idea. However, you’ll want to take into account that, in addition to moving companies costing more because of the number of people hiring them in the summer, they will also charge more due to the extreme heat.

 

If You’re Worried About Traffic

While during the day on the weekends there are fewer people out and about, moving between Monday and Thursday will be your best bet. Not only will it save you money because it is during the week but, if you go at the right times, you can also avoid rush hour. The best time of day to move is early to late morning.

Although you may run into some morning traffic with people rushing to work if you leave early, it will also give you ample time to get where you’re going. Leaving mid to late morning will allow you to avoid morning traffic and rush hour so you’ll arrive at your destination faster and not have to deal with the frustration of traffic.

 

Moving Tip Monday: Self Moving Tips

From Movinggal.com:
Moving heavy items while relocating to another place can take a toll on your back. The best way to avoid back injury while on the move is to utilize legs for lifting items instead of your back. Squat down, grasp the item and pick it up placing weight on your legs instead of your back. By exerting pressure on leg muscles you will be able to avoid back injury. You can simplify the process of lifting boxes by distributing weight of boxes evenly. This can be done by packing items in various boxes, instead of loading all items in one single box.

Moving Tip Monday: Self Moving Tips

Moving Tip Monday: Donate Used Home Goods

When you are you starting your move, you may find that some of your home goods will need to be moved on.  Perhaps they are only gently used and still work.  If so, consider donating furniture, appliances, extra construction supplies (such as tiles, shingles, windows, etc) and home goods like decor to Habitat for Humanity’s Restore.  We recommend our local Habitat for Humanity ReStore for North Central MA.  If your items can’t fit into your car, give them a call, they can usually arrange to pick up the items.  Even better, pick up a receipt from them so you can write off your donations on your taxes.

Moving Tip Monday: Donate Used Home Goods

Donate gently used furniture and home goods to Habitat for Humanity

 

Moving Tip Monday: Get Packing Help

Moving Tip Monday: Get Packing Help

Moving and Packing Tips, Moving Companies near Concord, MA, Littleton MA, Acton MA, Westford MA.

Include your friends and family to make packing easy for you.  Throw a packing party.  Supply them with food, drinks and music while you all work together to pack up all your small items, clothes and more!

Moving Tip Monday: Neighborhood Rules

When moving into a new neighborhood, take note of any neighborhood rules, laws, and parking regulations.  There could be ordinances on when people can move, trucks parking in areas, and if there are sound restrictions.  Get yourself off on the right foot in your new neighborhood.  Moving Tip Monday: Neighborhood Rules

Moving Tip Monday: Smoke Detectors

When you move in to your new place, one of the first things you should do is check that your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors work.  Replace batteries right away so you won’t have to worry about protecting your new property and anyone inside.

Moving Tip Monday: Smoke Detectors

Moving Tip Monday: When to Contact Utilities

Contact your utility companies one month prior.  Find out what you need to do to close out your old utilities and open up accounts for your new ones.  Provide a move in and move out date so that you don’t get additional charges or get your utilities shut off unexpectedly.

 

Moving Tip Monday: When to Contact Utilities

Moving Tip Monday: Refrigerator Moving

Moving Tip Monday: Refrigerator Moving  If you’re planning to move your refrigerator, try to use up what you have for food in the weeks leading up to your move.  That way, you have less to pack.  One day prior to your move, clean out your refrigerator, place food you want to save into a friend or neighbor’s refrigerator or a heavily iced cooler.  Then defrost your refrigerator and dry it out so it’s ready for the move.