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10 Tips for Moving to a New Neighborhood

Moving your family is stressful, no matter how far your old home is away from your new one. You have to pack up your possessions, bid friends goodbye, and often change schools and jobs. Becoming part of a new neighborhood takes some time, but you can speed up the process by being proactive and planning your integration into the new territory. While everyone’s experience is unique, experts agree on certain helpful steps to make you feel at home fast.

1. Professional Movers

Hiring professional movers can save your sanity and your dining room table. An experienced crew will perform much of the physical labor and protect your beloved possessions. While Uncle Jerry may have good intentions, your piano may not survive the back of his camper. Even with the help of professional movers, you’ll still have plenty to do, but professionals can significantly lessen your stress.

2. Research

Before the move, thoroughly research your new neighborhood. Learn everything you can about the schools and community organizations before you arrive. Create a list of local attractions and events that appeal to your family so you can begin to enjoy your new surroundings. You will have fun and quickly meet new people. The more you are out and about, the faster you become part of the neighborhood.

3. Introductions

In televisions shows, the people next door show up on your porch with a pot roast and offers to help you move in. In reality, they may hesitate to intrude, knowing that you are probably overwhelmed with the move. Plus, their own family life is probably busy. Instead of waiting for them to come over, you should make the first move. You may see them in the yard or when they are headed out to work. Don’t hesitate to pop over and introduce yourself. Asking a simple question about the local shops can break the ice.

4. Volunteer

Once you have unpacked and caught your breath, consider volunteering. You can choose a new cause or continue the type of work you were doing in your previous home. For instance, volunteer at the local hospital, join the neighborhood march against breast cancer or volunteer at a local food pantry. You will feel good about yourself and also meet like-minded people who will appreciate your commitment to your new community.

5. Carpool

Carpooling to work or school saves you transportation expenses and may also help you bond quickly with other local residents. Sharing coffee, family anecdotes and even work complaints can be the foundation of beautiful relationships.

6. Dine Out

Dining out in your new location is helpful in several ways. You have a reprieve from food preparation and clean up while getting a real sense of the neighborhood. People and places will soon become familiar, and your presence will be noted by the locals. You may soon become regulars at a few favorite restaurants.

7. HOA

You should get to know your Homeowners Association as soon as possible. Study their rules closely so that you don’t inadvertently violate them and cause hard feelings in the neighborhood. Keep your grass trimmed, attend the meetings and offer suggestions as time goes by. Your concern will be noted by your neighbors, who will see that you are responsible and committed to your new home.

8. Entertain

Entertaining your neighbors doesn’t require a formal dinner party. You can host a few people at a backyard barbecue or a movie night with little effort or expense. You should consider these invites as an investment in your home. When you cultivate cordial relationships in your neighborhood, you help to create a secure and happy environment for your family. You may receive some reciprocal invitations as well.

9. Education

If you take a class at the local community college or other educational organization, you will enrich your life and spend time with others who have some of the same interests. If you don’t want to go that route, sign up for an exercise or dance class. Join a gym. It’s important to your mental health that you interact with people in person. Studies show that doing so helps fight depression.

10. Religion

If you are religious, joining a neighborhood house of worship is one of the most effective ways to become part of the community. You will meet regularly with those that share your beliefs and participate in the many social occasions that come with being an active member. Your new worship family should help you feel welcome and at home. If you have children, a house of worship can offer them instant playmates, so they won’t feel as homesick for their old friends

Moving to a new home can be wonderful. You can ease the pain of moving by planning ahead, researching your new neighborhood and diving into community life once you arrive. While you may feel displaced and inclined to isolate, you shouldn’t. Grab the grill by the handles and get to know your neighbors. By this time next year, you can be a vital part of your new community.

Contact Us!

If you’re interested in getting help on moving day, contact Ayer Moving & Storage for a free estimate. We offer moving assistance with local, interstate and international moves. We also provide moving truck rentals, storage services, and packing help, so call today to let us know which services you need.

How to Prepare for a Military Family Move

9 Things to Remember When Preparing for a Military Family Move

Have you received military orders in a new host country? You may be full of excitement, but don’t let the big move cause extra stress. Here’s a checklist of essentials to remember throughout your move.

1. Keep All Your Legal Documents and Receipts in One Binder

There will be a lot of expenses during your move. To ensure you can get reimbursed properly, keep all your receipts in one folder. Other documents, such as your family’s passports, children’s medical records, and immunization documents should all be stored safely. You should also store transportation tickets (airline, train or boat) in this folder. Your marriage license and your children’s birth certificates are essential. Never let them get lost!

2. Apply for Passports and Visas

Your passport may be in order, but what about your spouse’s and children’s? If you do have a holiday while you are stationed in another country, you may want to do some sightseeing in another country besides your host country. This could be a great travel and learning experience for your kids. So make sure that both your government passports and your personal passports are in order. Start working on your area clearances and visa process, if necessary.

3. Decide If You Want to Live Off-post or On-post

This depends on your family’s needs. Do you want to be in a community with other military families, or would you rather live more like the locals? This is an important decision, as it affects your children and family members. Get clear on your personal choices and reasons for doing so.

4. Do a Household Inventory

In reality, you will not be able to ship all your possessions to your new destination. How much you are allowed to bring depends on your rank and length of service. Hiring a reliable moving company and packing services can ensure that you are able to bring the most necessary items. Whatever you have to leave, make an inventory. This way, you know whether or not to buy that item in the future. You can also arrange to take valuable items to trusted family members who can store them for you. Find out whether your service can handle some of the storage and moving fees.

5. Define Your Packing Strategy

Packing professionals say it’s important to pack in a systematic, organized way. You may have to move your possessions in several batches. Some items will not be necessary to have on hand immediately. These include the following:

  • Unaccompanied baggage — shipments that can arrive after you do (such as sports equipment or non-seasonal clothing)
  • Household goods — if shipped by sea, household goods (such as an extra cutlery set, for example) will take a few weeks to arrive

6. Make a Realistic Plan for Your Pets

If none of your family members or friends can take care of your pets for you while you’re away, you need to find other solutions. For example, local non-profits or organizations can help you find volunteer host families for your household pets. Communicate with your moving truck rental company if you need help in shipping your furry friends somewhere. Getting professional help is essential in reducing moving-related stress for you and your family. If you have young children, leaving their pets can be very emotional, so be patient and understanding during this time.

7. Review Your Home Insurance Policy

Unless you are renting a home, you want to have a good home insurance policy set up before you leave. Under the US Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act, it is your legal right to terminate a lease upon PCS orders. Just make sure you have the necessary documents printed out to show your landlord. If you own your home and decide to rent it out, go through a property contractor or real estate agent who can help you lease to good and trustworthy tenants.

8. Make a Plan for Your Vehicle

It may be possible for your family to get coverage for shipping your vehicle. Find out if the military will cover the expense of shipping your vehicle overseas. It may come in handy and save you lots of dollars in your host country.

9. Assign a Contact Person in Your Home Country to Handle Legal Documents and Proceedings

No matter how long you are going to be stationed overseas — whether a few months or a few years — you need to have a contact person in your home country. They could be a trusted family member or friend. They can help you with arranging shipping or other legal requirements. If anyone needs to contact you, they can go through your contact person, to relay news or messages.

Need to avail of the best packing, moving, storage and truck rental services for your military family move? Ayer Moving does it all. Contact us today for more information.

15 Apartment Packing Hacks

Moving is hard enough as it is. Why not make your life easier with these 15 Apartment Packing Hacks?

Use plastic wrap

On any bottles of liquids that you are transporting, wrap plastic wrap under the cap to prevent it from spilling.

Protect your drinking glasses with socks

This will help to cushion them and protect them from breaking during the move.

Use a slice of bread to clean up a mess

Accidents happen. If you break something made of glass while packing, use bread to safely pick the pieces of glass and make sure that none is left behind.

Use duct tape to label your cords

Cords all look the same. By using a piece of duct tape to label what they are, it’ll save time setting everything up when you reach your destination.

Pack your documents in plastic bags

Sealing your documents in plastic bags will keep them protected during the move and make them easier to transport.

Pack your toolbox last

You’ll likely need your tools to put some of your items back together or to hang anything up so make sure it is the last thing you pack and the first thing you unload.

Use clothing for cushion

When packing your dishware, instead of using more bubble wrap trying wrapping some of them in your clothes to save money and keep them protected.

Color Code

Color coding your boxes will make them easier for you to find when you unpack.

Put your dried up tape in the microwave

If you painters or masking tape has dried up, put it in the microwave quickly and it will become sticky again.

Use styrofoam plates

Put styrofoam plates in between your plates to protect them during the move.

Label your boxes on the sides

If you label your boxes on the top, you won’t be able to see what is what when they are all stacked up. This will allow you to know what is where at all times.

Find free moving boxes

Find free moving boxes on the free section of Craigslist or from your local grocery or department stores.

Take pictures of your electronics

Take a picture of the wiring on your electronics so that you will know how to set them back up after the move.

Put your clothes in garbage bags

Keep your clothes on hangers and slips them into garbage bags to make them easier to pack and unpack.

Put your loose screws in sandwich bags

If you have any loose screws from dismantling large furniture, put them in sandwich bags and label where they came from.

Need More Help?

You can reach us at 1 (800) 233-6683 or visit your local Massachusetts moving company to learn more about what we can do to help you. Download the Ayer Moving Guide for a Stress-Free Move!

Moving Tip Monday: Save Your Back

Save your back, hire a moving company to help you move.  Whether it’s just some of the heavier, large furniture pieces or everything you plan to move, Ayer Moving and Storage can help you with your move.  We are available for cross country and international moves as well.

Moving Tip Monday: Save Your Back

Save your back, hire a moving company when you’re moving to Central MA, Fort Devens, Pepperell Dunstable, Concord

Moving Tip Monday: Self Moving Tips

From Movinggal.com:
Moving heavy items while relocating to another place can take a toll on your back. The best way to avoid back injury while on the move is to utilize legs for lifting items instead of your back. Squat down, grasp the item and pick it up placing weight on your legs instead of your back. By exerting pressure on leg muscles you will be able to avoid back injury. You can simplify the process of lifting boxes by distributing weight of boxes evenly. This can be done by packing items in various boxes, instead of loading all items in one single box.

Moving Tip Monday: Self Moving Tips

Moving Tip Monday: Donate Used Home Goods

When you are you starting your move, you may find that some of your home goods will need to be moved on.  Perhaps they are only gently used and still work.  If so, consider donating furniture, appliances, extra construction supplies (such as tiles, shingles, windows, etc) and home goods like decor to Habitat for Humanity’s Restore.  We recommend our local Habitat for Humanity ReStore for North Central MA.  If your items can’t fit into your car, give them a call, they can usually arrange to pick up the items.  Even better, pick up a receipt from them so you can write off your donations on your taxes.

Moving Tip Monday: Donate Used Home Goods

Donate gently used furniture and home goods to Habitat for Humanity

 

Moving Tip Monday: Valuables and Jewelry

When moving, keep your valuables, such as jewelry, cash, and collectibles with you.  Make sure they are secured in your new home immediately upon moving.  Thieves often target moving trucks and packed cars for these valuable items so don’t let them out of your sight!

Moving Tip Monday: Valuables and Jewelry

Moving Tip Monday: Neighborhood Rules

When moving into a new neighborhood, take note of any neighborhood rules, laws, and parking regulations.  There could be ordinances on when people can move, trucks parking in areas, and if there are sound restrictions.  Get yourself off on the right foot in your new neighborhood.  Moving Tip Monday: Neighborhood Rules

Moving Tip Monday: Smoke Detectors

When you move in to your new place, one of the first things you should do is check that your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors work.  Replace batteries right away so you won’t have to worry about protecting your new property and anyone inside.

Moving Tip Monday: Smoke Detectors

Moving Tip Monday: Appliances

When you move, you’re likely going to leave behind some appliances.  Maybe a stove, washer and dryer or other smaller appliances.  Leave behind any system warranties and manuals.  Also, if you’ve had these appliances serviced, leave behind who the service provider was and any information on service provided.
Moving Tip Monday: Appliances