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Essential Tips for Packing Fragile Items

If you think that you don’t have a lot of fragile items to pack, go look in your kitchen cabinets. We all have them and assuming you’re already spending a lot of money your move, you don’t really want to spend more replacing the things that broke on the way. So take a look at some essential tips for packing fragile items.

Packing Fragile Items Tip #1

Prepare

Sounds simple, right? But with all the things that you have to do, it’s only natural that certain to-do items might get pushed off. This should not be one of them. You’ll want to take all of the time you can get packing up your breakable items to make sure that they receive the care and protection they’ll need for the journey.

Take whatever mental preparation you need and then set out for the right equipment. You’ll want to be well stocked on study boxes, cardboard, packing tape, bubble wrap, packing paper, and more bubble wrap. You’re going to want to lay out all of your supplies and have a large section of floor space or a big table for this project.

Packing Fragile Items Tip #2

Be Considerate

Your fragile items have needs too. Instead of trying to save time and space by filling up one big box with all of your breakable objects, you’re going to want to split them up. Make sure you have an ample supply of boxes in all shapes and sizes and be sparing with what you pack. If you have one ceramic bowl that is really important to you and was passed down through the family don’t hesitate to give it its own box.

Packing Fragile Items Tip #3

Know Your Packing Supplies

Regular newspaper can stain china dishes but will be fine for regular glassware. Too much bubble wrap can put too much pressure on your items if you pack the entire box with it. Be wary of what you’re using and how much you use of your packing supplies to have the most success with preserving your items.

Packing Fragile Items Tip #4

Educate Yourself

Not every fragile item you have can be packed the same way and whether there is a right way or wrong way to pack them, there is a better way.

Need More Help?

You can reach us at 1 (800) 233-6683 or visit your local Massachusetts moving company to learn more about what we can do to help you. Download the Ayer Moving Guide for a Stress-Free Move!

 

Should I Hire a Professional Mover? Making Moving Easier

Everyone knows moving isn’t all sunshine and daisies. It takes a lot of time, a lot of work, a lot of money, and a whole lot of stress. So, if you’re worried about making your move and how much pressure it’s going to put on you, then maybe you should consider hiring a professional mover to help make your big move run smoothly.

A Professional Mover is Reliable

Friends and family are always a great help during a move, but some tasks are just too big for you to handle during a move. For a professional mover, this is what they specialize in. Not only have they done this many times before but they went through professional training to ensure that they know exactly what they’re doing.

A Professional Mover is Fast and Efficient

Remember that thing about moving taking a lot of time? A professional mover will be able to help you lessen it. Instead of you and your family trying to get everything moved out of your house and organized and into a truck, the movers can do all of that for you with their expertise leading the way. They’ll be efficient in handling all of you heavy and bulky boxes, and moving companies pride themselves on being prompt and on time from pickup to delivery.

A Professional Mover is Safety Assured

On top of everything else you have to do, you don’t really want to have to deal with a pulled back muscle from lifting the boxes or a broken toe from dropping your microwave. Professional movers know what they’re doing and rest assured they’re strong enough to do it. You can stand back and relax knowing that you’re safe from you moving hazards and that all of your belongings are in steady and capable hands.

A Professional Mover is Accountable

You might not think so, but the second you start packing up for a move, you’re going to realize just how much stuff you actually have. Professional movers can leave you with the peace of mind of knowing that everything you have will be accounted for and in the right place at the right time. Moving companies will take a careful inventory of everything that you have and be sure to everything present and accounted for by the time you reach your new home.

A Professional Mover has Equipment

Moving takes a lot of careful organizing and equipment to keep all of your belongings packed and safe and unfortunately, that truck you were going to borrow from your buddy might not cut it. Professional movers will come equipped with everything that you need to pack up and move out safely from dollies for your appliances and electronics to ramps, to cushions to support our more breakable items.

A Professional Mover can give you Peace of Mind

Moving a large appliance can be tough.  So spending that little extra money to hire professionals to handle all of your expensive, breakable, or sentimental items might just pay for itself. You can rest easy knowing that highly trained experts are taking care of your belongings and you can trust them to handle everything with care and efficiency.

Need More Help?

You can reach us at 1 (800) 233-6683 or visit your local Massachusetts moving company to learn more about what we can do to help you. Download the Ayer Moving Guide for a Stress-Free Move!

Aquarium of Fish to Move? No Problem

Moving an aquarium full of fish is an intimidating process. As you prepare for the move, you’ll want to consider whether or not you’re are ready to take on the challenge yourself or if you should hire a professional mover. If you decide you’re up to the task, here’s what you need to know to do it right and help ensure the safety of your fish.

You Should Know

There are a few things you should be aware of before you make the move.

Fish are very sensitive and delicate creatures, especially regarding changes in their environment. Moving is a stressful time for them too and they are often too stressed to eat. If you do it right, you can preserve many of your fish, but be aware that some may not survive the trip. For the best odds, you’ll want to minimize the amount of time they are out of their aquarium. Pack your aquarium last before moving and set it up first when you get there.

If you have a long move ahead of you, there is one option you may want to consider: Start fresh with a new collection of fish. The chances of the majority of your fish dying during your journey increases the further away you move. Your best option may be to give them away before you move and then visit a local pet store at your new home. If you don’t know anyone who would like to take your fish, try an online classifieds page like Craigslist.org.

Before The Move

When looking at your new home, scope out a location for your fish. Find a spot that is protected from the sun and has access to electricity. Make sure to check that the surface is sturdy and smooth to support your tank.

Your fish won’t want to eat during the move and it is a good idea to not feed them a full day in advance. You want to keep the water as clear as you can. Don’t worry, fish can go a week without eating so you are not putting them at risk by not feeding them.

Emptying the Aquarium

Make sure that you have a siphon hose, several 5-gallon buckets and a fish net for getting everything out of your aquarium.

Use the siphon hose to drain some of the water into the 5-gallon buckets. Only fill them about two-thirds of the way to make sure they don’t spill during the move. Then, catch your fish with the fish net and gently place them in one of the newly filled water buckets. Depending on how many fish you have, you may want to put them in more than one bucket. Please don’t forget any fish.

If you have them, put the tops on the buckets. Make sure that fresh air can still get in. You can poke holes in the top or get an air pump to make sure there is enough oxygen in the water. If you don’t have a top to the container, you can use grocery bags, which will keep the water in and still allow air through.

Next, remove any decorations from the fish tank and dry them thoroughly. Then wrap them in packing paper or bubble wrap. You can pack them in another bucket or just in a cardboard box. If you have any living plants you can put them in a plastic bag with some water and move them by hand.

Drain all the remaining water into the remaining buckets and get as much as you can. Any water left in the aquarium can crack or shatter the bottom when you move it. Remove any sand or gravel at the bottom of the aquarium and put it in a spare bucket to transport.

Packing the Aquarium

To pack up the glass structure you will want to thoroughly wrap it in bubble wrap. Be sure to seal it with tape so the bubble wrap doesn’t fall off. You’ll also want to wrap it thickly in blankets to make sure it stays safe.

If it is a large aquarium, enlist some help from friends or family to move it to the moving vehicle.

Unpacking

As said before, unpack your aquarium first when you arrive at the new home. Ignore all other boxes. Move the tank carefully to your previously picked out spot. Once in place, double check to make sure that the structure and what it’s sitting on is sturdy and intact.

Once you carefully remove all the blankets and bubble wrap, you can put the transported gravel back in. Set up your pumps, lights, filters, and heaters but do not turn anything on. Doing so without water in the tank can injure you and your fish.

You can now put all the decorations back in the tank and refill it with the water that you transported. After the aquarium is filled with some of the water, catch your fish with the fish net and gently set them back into the tank. Fill the aquarium up with the rest of the water. You may need to add some dechlorinated tap water to finish filling the tank.

Allow the tank to sit for approximately, a half hour so that the water can equalize with the room temperature before you turn the heaters on. After that, you will want to check that everything is functioning properly and continue to check on your tank and the fish for the next few days.

It is a good idea to find a fish store in your area. If you have any problems with your fish or tank, or if there is something you need to replace, you’ll know just where to go.

Sound Like a Lot of Work?

Good luck! If that sounds like too much work, call us at 1 (800) 233-6683  or visit your local Massachusetts moving company to discuss hiring expert help. Also, consider downloading our packing guide for more expert moving advice.

How to Pack and Move your Holiday Decorations

Home decorations really make the holidays come alive in a home. Be it colored lights, ornaments on a Christmas tree, a Menorah for Hanukkah, or paper snowflakes on the window for the solstice, these bright and colorful heirlooms bring out the spirit of the season. Most people have a system to store them for the offseason, but what do you do when it’s time to move? Packing holiday decorations takes a little more care, but with the right approach, they will be in perfect condition for next year.

 

Use durable containers

Worn-out boxes with the ends flapping open are a normal way to pack holiday decorations when moving them from the living room to the back of a closet, but those decade-old boxes are too soft and fragile for a moving truck where they could be stacked four deep. Invest in a strong, crisp, new packing box to weather the coming road bumps and brake taps from the truck.

 

Keep things separate

Most of us can remember growing up with that big cardboard box with all the decorations heaped into the center. That may cut it when you have a handful of decorations that all need to come out at the same time, but the risk of individual items chipping, cracking, and breaking goes up when the box is moved across several states.

Keep an open mind for potential storage solutions that will help you keep ornaments separated and organized, such as egg cartons and muffin tins. Strings of lights can be wrapped around a spool, even if it’s just an H-shaped piece of cardboard. Don’t reuse old newspapers, as the ink can rub off and stain light-colored decorations.

 

Prepare for travel

Remember, you’re not just setting your delicate decorations in a box in an attic undisturbed for another 11 months, you’re putting them into the back of a truck and they will need more support and protection. Bubble wrap, foam sheets and pieces of cloth can keep hard times from contacting one another and fragile ornaments from breaking under pressure.

Make sure you label your decoration boxes, as they will likely be moving with many other boxes. That way, if you want to decorate immediately after moving in, you will have no trouble finding them.

Labeling will also come in handy when the holiday is over and you want to put the decorations away in the same boxes you moved with.

 

Retire with honors

Getting new holiday decorations can be addictive, and it’s common for people to give little ornaments as gifts. Preparing for a move is often a time to purge needless belongings, and that is especially true for holiday decorations. If you’re not sure if you can part with a particular item, consider taking a digital photo of it and save backup copies in a few places. That way you can look at it whenever you feel nostalgic, but still have more space in your house.

If you need some packing supplies to protect your holiday decorations or any other items, stop by our location on Central Avenue in Ayer or give us a call at 1 (800) 233-MOVE.

 

 

Picking a Moving Date That’s Right For Your Needs

Deciding when you’re going to move is stressful. There are so many factors to consider to come up with the perfect date and you want to make your move as easy as you can on everyone involved. With a move already putting a strain on your everyday life, it is important to pick the perfect moving day that suits all of your needs.

Here’s what you need to consider:

If You Have Kids

If you have kids you’ll want to consider when is best for them. Most kids find it more difficult to move in the middle of the school year because curriculums are unlikely to line up at both schools. The stress of starting school in the middle of the year with no friends can often be overwhelming and result in a lot of stress and low grades. Because of this, it is a good idea to move during the summer.

You may be eager to get going right after your child completes a grade but it is likely they don’t feel the same way. Give them a week or two to say goodbye to all their friends, in and out of the neighborhood, and to allow them to adapt to the idea of moving. If you want to move at the end of the summer, be sure that it is a few weeks before school starts back up for your kid. Give them some time to get acquainted with the new house and the people in the neighborhood before throwing them back into school.

Unfortunately, the almost universal desire to avoid breaking up a school year leads most families to prefer to pick a moving date during summer break, and this means…

 

If You’re Worried About Cost

The summer is the most costly time of the year to move because it’s the busiest. With most people moving in late May to early October, and the absolute busiest days at the end of June and July, the rush of people hiring moving trucks in the summer results in higher rates. There’s only so many moving companies and vehicles to hire and the demand pushes up prices.

The weekends are also an expensive time to move with most people trying to make the switch when they aren’t working. It is best to avoid the holidays when it comes to moving because any time off will result in an influx of people trying to hire companies. The most cost effective time of the year is likely to be late fall before Christmas and Hannukah and winter.

Don’t wait until the last minute to hire your moving company. If you really need a specific day, you are going to want to hire them weeks ahead of time to ensure that you get the day and the company you want.

 

If You’re Renting

Most people try to rent during spring and summer. This is when people get off of work and out of school so you have many college students leaving their apartments. This means that there will be a lot on the market during these busy months so you will have the most options.

However, with so many people looking for a place, it gives you less time to decide if you really want to rent. You will likely not have the time to negotiate a lower price so renting in the spring and summer will be the most expensive.

The winter can be a very good time to rent because fewer people have a desire to move in the cold. Renters will be eager to get their places under contract and therefore will be much more likely to negotiate a lower cost.

 

If You’re Worried About The Weather

The weather is a very big factor when considering when you want to move. If you don’t want to get caught in the rain or snow or are incredibly opposed to moving in the cold, then you will want to schedule your move for summer. If you have wooden or even some plastic items that are very important to you, special preparations may be needed to protect them from the elements.

Moving somewhere cold to somewhere warm and vice versa can damage some of your belongings if the temperature changes are very extreme, so consider a summer moving date when temperatures are more forgiving might be a good idea. However, you’ll want to take into account that, in addition to moving companies costing more because of the number of people hiring them in the summer, they will also charge more due to the extreme heat.

 

If You’re Worried About Traffic

While during the day on the weekends there are fewer people out and about, moving between Monday and Thursday will be your best bet. Not only will it save you money because it is during the week but, if you go at the right times, you can also avoid rush hour. The best time of day to move is early to late morning.

Although you may run into some morning traffic with people rushing to work if you leave early, it will also give you ample time to get where you’re going. Leaving mid to late morning will allow you to avoid morning traffic and rush hour so you’ll arrive at your destination faster and not have to deal with the frustration of traffic.

 

Halloween is a great time to connect to the new neighbors

 

Fewer and fewer people know the folks in their neighborhood today. If you want to be the exception and get to know the people who live near you, then Halloween is a great time to reach out and meet the neighbors.

If you just moved into a new neighborhood and would like an excuse to knock on the doors of a few neighbors you have a good opportunity. Your neighbors are the best source of information on how many trick-or-treaters to expect and how much candy to stock up on, and how elaborate the decorations can get. Try sharing something about your own Halloween experiences with them and a good conversation might follow.

Try going all-out on your yard decorations or even building a haunted house in your garage. This will help draw some positive attention from your neighbors and they may engage you in a conversation that leads to a friendship. Just don’t make your display audibly loud or include bright lights that may annoy your neighbors.

If you find that some of your neighbors don’t want to associate with you because of your tasteful Halloween display, well, those are the grumps you’d want to avoid anyway.

Consider holding a costume party on one of the nights near Halloween and inviting the people in your neighborhood. This will give you a good chance to meet people on your terms and a plausible reason to knock on doors to give out the invites. Just be careful that nothing valuable is on display in your home that can easily be stolen. If the weather is good it might be best to hold a gathering outdoors.

If you have kids of the right ages then tag along with them as they go trick-or-treating. You’ll get to see the neighborhood and meet all the people who live in it.

Today’s a different world and not enough people know who they live near, but with a little courage Halloween provides a lot of great opportunities to break the ice and meet the neighbors. That’s especially important when you’ve just moved into a new area, but it’s also helpful when you’ve lived in your current home for years and never found a chance to meet anyone nearby.

What not to pack when moving

Moving is always an intimidating process. People have to pack everything they own into cardboard boxes and load them into the back of a large truck. It’s a colossal task

One thing to keep in mind is you shouldn’t put everything in that truck. There are some items that are too valuable or volatile to pack next to your socks and Lonesome Dove DVD. In general, you should avoid items that are:

Valuable

Not just in terms of cash value, but of personal value to you. Irreplaceable items like photo albums, small heirlooms and your wedding video should be set aside and put in your personal vehicle for the move. Also things like cash, jewelry, legal documents and stocks and bonds are too valuable to place in the moving truck, which could be targeted by thieves.

Dangerous

Don’t load a moving truck with combustible materials like gasoline, matches, ammunition, paint thinners and aerosol cans because of the potential fire hazard. Also, be careful to exclude pressured containers like propane tanks, fire extinguishers and oxygen tanks. Hazardous chemicals like bleach, ammonia or car batteries should also be left behind. Contact your public works department for advice on how to safely dispose of them before you leave.

Perishable

Some foods like canned green beans can certainly make the journey, but when you’re cleaning out your cupboard don’t try to chance it with items like frozen food in a cooler. You may get delayed or arrive too tired to unload and end up attracting insects or rodents. The same goes for produce, dairy products and anything in a breakable glass jar.

Moving is a big process and unfortunately, some materials simply won’t survive a long journey. Fortunately, most of those items are inexpensive and easily replaced and the risk of harming the rest of your stuff they present makes the decision to leave them behind an easy one.

Decluttering before you move

Chances are somewhere in your home is a big cup full of pens. Pens with business names, ballpoint tips, felt tips, clickable and capped pens, black and blue ink, and a few pencils. It’s usually a plastic cup, but it sometimes a large glass or a mug. Once in a while it’s a shallow box at the front of a drawer bursting with pens. Whatever the variations are, you probably have one right now.

Now imagine your life without that cup of pens.

We all accumulate little things here and there over time. A lot of those things are useful, but only up to a point or for very specific circumstances. The life you imagined without that cup of pens should not be any different because you would still have other pens to use.

However, when you move, every item adds weight and volume to your boxes, regardless of the item’s actual usefulness. That’s one of the many reasons generations of people have used moving time as a chance to get rid of excess stuff.

The trick is convincing yourself that you can get rid of perfectly good items, many of which you paid for with real money. Let that thought go and ask yourself if the item is doing you any good today, or if it’s just taking up space.

Here’s some more good questions to ask yourself: Do I have something else that does the same thing as this item? Do these clothes actually fit me anymore and how often do I actually wear them? When was the last time I used this thing? Is this a broken thing I said I’d fix but never did? If I lost this item would I even bother to replace it? Is this a nostalgic item I could take a digital photo of instead of keeping?

Try leaving your home and imagining that you lost everything and had to start over. Write down what you would need – everything from a toothbrush to a bed frame. Be specific, and add anything you would like to have, like your photo albums. When you get home look very hard at the items that you did not include. If you forgot about them, perhaps they’re not so important after all.

What you actually do with the excess stuff is up to you: Moving sales, Craigslist ads, donations to thrift stores and landfills are all popular choices (Usually in that order). The important thing is to get rid of it. In time, your place can look more like something from an interior design magazine with lots of free space and simple, clean rooms.

Moving with pets in the summer – The arrival

You’ve just arrived at your new home, but your pets will be confused about the new surroundings.

It might be best to find a nearby kennel of friend to hold onto your pets while you move in. If you’re moving in the summer the house will likely be the same temperature as the outdoor weather when you first move in, and the front door and any yard gates will be wide open for hours at a time.

Wait until the moving vehicles are unloaded before bringing your pets inside. Until then, make sure they are in a comfortable place and have plenty of water.

Don’t forget to update your address and any other information on pet ID tags and microchips your pets wear. It’s also a good idea to take good identifying photos of your pets on your phone so if they do get loose you have images of them handy.

As stressful as moving can be, it’s also exciting and refreshing in many ways. A little preparation and strategic actions can make the difference between starting on a sour note and a happy one.

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Click here for Part 2

Moving with pets in the summer (Part 2)

Moving with pets on moving day can be a chaotic activity. The house is being taken apart piece by piece, the front door is propped open for a long stretch of time and people are coming in and out all day.

Now imagine a few loose, agitated animals thrown into the mix. It’s not pretty.
Pets need to be kept out of the way for their safety and your sanity. Placing them with a friend or a kennel for a few days is your best option, as they’ll be happy, fed and prevented from running out the door.

If that’s not an option, you could close them in an already empty room and place a sign on the door that reads “Do not open – pets inside!”

If you’re planning to bring a few items in a vehicle with you make sure you put the pet carriers in first so they are level and air and light can get inside. Load the carriers empty because you don’t want to leave pets in a hot car.

The move itself will be a dramatic change for the pet’s routine, so start making tiny changes each day as you lead up to moving day. Move the cat’s food dish to a new location. Switch up the route or time when you walk your dog. This will your pets get used to some level of change ahead of time.

Moving day is stressful enough. These steps can reduce the stress your pets feel and put them in a better mood to accept their new surroundings.