Things to Know if You Are Moving to Leominster MA

Things to Know if You Are Moving to Leominster MA

The first thing you need to know if you are moving to Leominster is how to pronounce the name!  No matter how it is spelled, saying “Lee-O-Minster” will just make you stick out as the newbie on the block.  Leominster is correctly pronounced “Lemon-Stir” or as the locals say it: “Lemon-Stuh.”

Leominster has History

If you are moving to Leominster MA, then you need to know a little bit about its history. The name comes from Leominster, Hereforshire, England and the region was originally inhabited by the Pennacook or Nipmuc Native American tribes who lived along the Nashua River as part of the town of Lancaster. European settlers began to settle in the mid-17th century. The Natives and the settlers lived peacefully together until the start of King Philip’s War in 1675. Many hundreds lost their lives and drove the inhabitants from the area.

After the war, the settlers negotiated with Chief Sholan of the Nashaway tribe for the land, the only parcel of land to be legally purchased from the Native Americans in Central Massachusetts.

During the Civil War, Leominster was a major contributor in the Underground Railroad. The Emory Stearn Schoolhouse, and the John Drake Home, led anti-slavery campaigns and helped house fugitive slaves.

An Economic Shift in Leominster

If you are moving to Leominster MA, then you need to know a little bit about its economics. Leominster was mostly a small farming community, but the beginning of the 19th century, brought a shift to manufacturing. A regional transportation hub by 1800, Leominster boasted several turnpikes and connector roads. The opening of the Fitchburg Railroad in 1808 made manufacturing possible with the rail running through North Leominster and into Boston. In addition, the Fitchburg and Worcester Railroad ran through the center of town and by the mid-1800s, paper mills, piano makers, and comb manufacturers were moving to Leominster and established factories along the Monoosnoc Brook and the Nashua River.

The earliest settlers in Leominster were of British ancestry, but soon immigrants were moving to Leominster to work in the factories from Ireland, Canada, and Italy. Leominster became the home of the Dupont Viscoloid Company (plastics), Foster Grant (combs and sunglasses), Tupperware, Standard Tool, and the Whitney Carriage Company (baby carriages), among others.

Leominster is a Plastic Town

If you are moving to Leominster MA, then you need to know it is famous for plastics. Perhaps the most famous company in Leominster (other than Tupperware) was the Union Products Company, maker of the popular pink flamingo lawn ornament. Although the Great Depression slowed the plastic industry in Leominster and in recent years manufacturing in general has moved out of the city, Leominster will always be remembered as Plastic Town.

The second largest city in Worcester County, Leominster in 2018 had a population of 41,823.  The city is divided into several small villages known as French Hill, originally inhabited by French immigrants; Morse Hollow, North Leominster, Rice Hill, the Flats, the Bowery, the West Side, and the Car Barn area, located along the Fitchburg order. The Car Barn Area got its name because the Fitchburg & Leominster Railway trolley cars were stored in this area.

Leominster has a City Government

Leominster is governed by a Mayor and City Council. City Hall is located at 25 West Street and its operating hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday 8:30 am to 4:00 pm. Thursdays City Hall is open 8:30 am to 5:30 am. City Departments include the Assessor’s Office, Collector & Treasurer, Comptroller, Parking Clerk, Planning & Development, Purchasing, Weights & Measures, and the Retirement Board.

If you are moving to Leominster, you’ll want to visit the Leominster Public Library, located at 30 West Street. Because of Covid-19, the library is open for limited hours for browsing. Call 978-534-752 for updated information.

Leominster has Great Schools

If you are moving to Leominster MA the educational system there is important to you. There are thirteen public schools in Leominster. Bennett School and Lincoln School are Pre-school; Fall Brook, Frances Drake, Johnny Appleseed, Northwest School, and Priest Street School are Elementary schools; Samoset School and Sky View are Middle Schools; and the Center for Technology Education and Innovation as Leominster Center for Excellence are High Schools.

What to Do in Leominster?

Leominster is a bustling city with fine schools and lots to do. In Part II of our series on Things to Know if You Are Moving to Leominster MA will introduce Johnny Appleseed and why Leominster claims him as their own, as well as features on the culture, night-life, and happenings in Leominster.

 

Should you use your Attic for Storage? The Answer is No, and Here's Why...

Should you use your Attic for Storage? The Answer is No, and Here’s Why…

Should you use your attic for storage? The Answer is No, and Here’s Why You May Want to Think Twice.

Our home collects our memories, our travels and sometimes a lot of our belongings. After some time, the spaces begin to fill up and we look for storage in every room and every corner. We see places such as our basements and attics as perfect storage rooms for our clothes and holiday decorations. Although putting boxes away is great for keeping your home clean and organized, storing them in your attic is more dangerous then you may think.

Here is what a roofer would say when asked if one should store items in their attic.

The answer: No. Do not ever store items in your attic space. The reason is linked with your home’s insulation and ventilation.

First let me explain what role your attic plays in your roof’s life expectancy. The attic is the heart and lifeline of your roof. A well ventilated and insulated attic will assist the roof in providing protection from the crazy New England weather. Attic ventilation works on the principle that heated air naturally rises, primarily utilizing two types of vents:

Intake vents, located at the lowest part of the roof under the eaves, allow cool air to enter the attic. Hot air exhaust vents, located at the peak of the roof, allow hot air to escape.

Taking advantage of this natural process, referred to as passive ventilation, is the most common way to vent an attic. In order to facilitate this exchange of warm and cool air, the general rule of thumb suggests installing at least 1 sq.ft. of vent for every 300 sq.ft. of attic floor. Building codes vary, though, so check with your local building authority for the specifics that pertain to your community.

The way the attic is kept cool by its air intake in the eves of the attic and its air outtake in the ridge and peak of the attic room reduces the danger of iced dams, and unwanted leaks that can lead to rot and decay of your home’s wood and plywood.

Where do homeowners go wrong?

Many fall short when they decide to use their attic as a storage room. Using your attic as storage disrupts the process of attic ventilation and causes potential ice dams.

When we get a call for a leak in the winter months due to an ice dam, the first place we inspect is the interior of the attic. When we arrive in the attic and find that it is covered in boxes we know exactly what caused the leak and the ice dam in the first place.

The boxes of clothes in the attic have disturbed the air flow and have contributed to the cause of the ice dams. The boxes of holiday ornaments have been pressed up against the insulation which has also caused the insulation to lose its R value. (An insulating material’s resistance to conductive heat flow is measured or rated in terms of its thermal resistance or R-value — the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating effectiveness. The R-value depends on the type of insulation, its thickness, and its density.)

The boxes in the attic have added to the condensation, moisture and potential mold to the attic walls.
The boxes in the attic have allowed the hot and cold air to reach your roofing shingles. When asphalt shingles are met with hot and cold air it causes the shingle to prematurely age and lose a lot of their asphalt granulares.

These four reasons should make you question if it is even worth considering the attic as a storage room. Is it worth dealing with an ice dam or the risk of mold in the attic? Is it worth it to potentially premature age your roof because ventilation has been compromised?

The answer: No. Always no. It is not worth it. It is much wiser to have your belongings in designated closets or a storage facility then to cause issues for you and your home. There are several options for off-site storage, including in a temperature-controlled storage warehouse, a self-storage unit, or in a Container on Wheels ® (COW) for temporary storage.

As a roofer, we recommend that you always store in your home’s closets, or in a storage facility. Keep your attic floor clean and free of clutter.

Let the attic be an attic. This advice may save you thousands of dollars and a lot of unwanted leaks.and headaches.

10 Ways to Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic

10 Ways to Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic

Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic.

Small businesses have had to endure a lot since the beginning of the pandemic known as Covid-19.  Retail stores, restaurants, hair and nail salons, and recreational venues were closed and now that they are allowed to open, have to limit the number of patrons to conform to social distancing rules. Some businesses can’t hire staff because some people are afraid they will get sick if they go back to work.

When we support local business, we are supporting the local economy. Now is the time to help small businesses who need our patronage now more than ever. Here are some ways to do just that.

Support Local Businesses by Shopping Local

Look first to your local retailers – hardware stores, pharmacies, groceries, shoe stores, clothing boutiques, liquor stores. Don a mask and visit the stores for what you need. Check to see if they offer online selling with pickup or delivery service.

You can find local businesses to support by visiting your local Chambers of Commerce.

Some local chambers in our Area include:

North Central MA Chamber of Commerce

Nashoba Valley Chamber of Commerce

Marlborough Regional Chamber of Commerce

Worcester Area Chamber of Commerce

Support Local Businesses by Shopping locally online

Whether it is a retail store, supermarket, or restaurant, you can order online and then arrange for pick up or delivery.

To shop small local eEommerce stores visit over 2592 all over America on PRIVY.com

Support Local Businesses by Purchasing Gift Cards

Buy now and plan to use your gift cards later or for an online purchase. Your purchase helps keep cash flowing and doors open.

Buy Local Gift Cards from the North Central MA Region Today!

Support Local Businesses by Being a Generous Tipper

Wait staff depend on tips as their hourly rate is lower than you think. When there are fewer customers, the daily or weekly take-home takes a hit. Be generous and apply a larger than normal percentage to your tab for a tip.

Become a Discount Shopper Locally

If you haven’t yet discovered the joy of getting a bargain, be on the lookout for small businesses that are offering steep discounts to boost revenue. Purchase larger than normal quantities of sale items and you’ll be helping to keep a small business in business.

Order Local Restaurant Fare for Take Out

Preparing three meals a day at home can be a daunting task. Take a break and order take out for curb service or home delivery. Many restaurants are offering a limited menu at discounted pricing. You can order direct or through a food delivery service like UberEats.com or DoorDash.com. If the weather is nice and your favorite restaurant has outside table service, consider going out to eat.

Support Local Businesses and your Experiences on Social Media

Give your favorite stores and restaurants a “high five” by posting a review on social media. Whether you like standard review sites like yelp.com or reviews on the business Facebook page or if you enjoy snapping a photo of your food or purchase, the business will appreciate and benefit from the free exposure.

Keep Up Your Local Memberships if You Can

Even if you can’t attend the gym or class that was cancelled or live performance that didn’t happen, consider donating the cost to the business. If you had season tickets and half the season was cancelled, donate the unused portion rather than request a refund. These small donations will go a long way to ensuring a business or not-for-profit will be there next season when things are hopefully back to normal.

Many local businesses play it very “close to the vest” and will not be able to withstand several months with no or little revenue. Selecting one or more of the tips above, will not only be appreciated and remembered, it might be the difference between an OPEN or CLOSED sign in the months to come.

Halloween Decorations Made from Used Cardboard

Halloween Decorations Made from Used Cardboard

If you just moved in you’ll have plenty of leftover cardboard boxes on hand. Most of these boxes are destined for the dumpster, but before you toss them, consider making them into Halloween decorations so they can pull double duty before you’re done with them.

 

Cardboard Tombstones

First, you’ll have to figure out the sizes and shapes you want your tombstones to be. Cut out two of that shape to make it 3D and be sure to leave some cardboard at the bottom to fold over.

Use two pieces of cardboard the same length as your tombstones, each with a slit in the middle so you can put them together to created an X shape. Next, stand up the two tombstone pieces, fold over the bottom and tape them together with packing tape. Measure the width and height you’ll need to fill the sides of the tombstone and tape them to the sides.

Put the cardboard X inside your tombstone and tape it to one side to keep int standing and stop it from collapsing inwards. You’ll also want to put some small bags of sand or bricks in the base so it doesn’t fall over or blow away.

Next, you’ll want to give the tombstone a consistent exterior. You can coat it with a layer of paper mache to cover up the joints. Once it’s dry you can paint it, but you may want to coat it with some textured paint first to give it a rocky finish.

Use some stencils to add RIP or anything else you want on the tombstone. You can spray paint them with a darker color directly to the surface, or hot glue cut outs of letters to the tombstone. You can add some extra details if you like using other cardboard pieces or create a spiderweb effect with hot glue. Then stand them up and creepify your front lawn! For more detailed directions and pictures, check out this link.

 

Simple Little Ghosts

Cut out some little ghost shapes from cardboard boxes. You can make as many as you want. Slip these shapes into a white plastic bag and tape the back so that the plastic pulls taught. Use black construction paper to cut out a face and glue to the ghost. You can prop these ghosts in windows, tape them to the glass, or even hang them from the ceiling with a bit of string to haunt the room.

 

Spooky Ghost Town

With clean milk cartons and newspaper, you can make your own mini ghost town decorations. Glue the newspaper onto the milk cartons and paint windows and doors onto cardstock to glue onto the front of the newspaper-covered milk cartons. You can draw in creepy people, cats, ghosts, or pumpkins and even fill the cartons with candy for fun.

Just make sure the milk cartons have been thoroughly washed and dried before you start.

 

Robot Costume

Take a big cardboard box and cut out holes for arms, legs, and the head. Then cover the box in aluminum foil and secure it with tape. You can hunt around your house for shiny objects like CDs, or balls of tin foil or little buttons to tape or glue to the box to add details.

Take another smaller cardboard box, like a wide square shoe box, to make a headpiece. Decorate that as well and tape a string or strap to go under your chin so that it stays in place.

 

Wheelchair Costume Ideas

Cardboard boxes are the perfect way to make an elaborate costume for any kid that uses a wheelchair. The boxes are versatile and can do transform into a lot of different vehicles and platforms for your trick-or-treater.

Use a big box and some paints and make a pizza delivery truck or get fancy and shape some cardboard into The Batmobile. You can make Cinderella’s carriage with a cardboard pumpkin and cut out wheels, with painted-on doors and details. If your kids love Mario Kart, build the kart around their chair and press them and get the character’s costume so they can zoom from house to house on Halloween.

Moving Tip Monday: Shred Old Files

Before you move, shred any old files you have.  Paperwork that you no longer need with personal information should be shredded and disposed of.  Transport with you any documents you may need immediately (taxes, billing information and loan information).  By keeping these documents with you and securing them upon moving, you’ll be able to also protect your personal information from being stolen.  Also please, don’t forget to change your address so your mail with your information gets sent to your new address.Moving Tip Monday: Shred Old Files

Moving Tip Monday: When to Contact Utilities

Contact your utility companies one month prior.  Find out what you need to do to close out your old utilities and open up accounts for your new ones.  Provide a move in and move out date so that you don’t get additional charges or get your utilities shut off unexpectedly.

 

Moving Tip Monday: When to Contact Utilities