Five Tips for Holiday Moving

Five Tips for Holiday Moving

Holiday Moving is not an easy feat. Many people view the Holidays as a very stressful time.

Why would you want the upheaval inevitably brings during the Winter … during the Holidays?

Sometimes families don’t have a choice. Holiday moving could be related to the military, a job relocation, or a life event over which you have little control, can dictate the timing of a move. If you must move in the winter before, during, or after the Holidays, here are some tips that can help you stay organized while still enjoying the Holidays with your family.

Here are 5 Tips for Moving During the Holidays:

 

Book your Mover ASAP.

Many people have vacation time during the Holidays and requests for this period are many and available time slots, few.

List your Holiday obligations.

Decide what holiday festivities are non-negotiable and those that you can skip or postpone this year. Scale back on holiday decorating with a wreath on the front door and perhaps a tabletop tree in the house. You can pack the rest of your decorations, but you won’t be missing out on the holiday entirely.

Designate packing days.

Set aside days where packing is the top priority. Begin as early as possible and select an area where you can store your boxes … the garage or a spare room is ideal. Declutter room by room, removing the things you will not be taking with you and designate whether these items are to be donated or disposed of. Next pack items you will not be needing right away, like books, off-season clothing, and extra bedding and linens. Feel the holiday spirit by listening to holiday music or watching a holiday movie while you pack. 

Ask for help with your move.

Ask a friend or family member to help with moving boxes to your staging area or on the day of the move to sweep the front walk for the movers or to lay tarps over rugs and wood floors to keep them dry during the loading process. Someone to keep the children occupied when you are packing or on the day of your move is an invaluable service. Someone else might bring in lunch so you have one less thing to worry about. 

Protect your possessions.

During the winter months, it is important to take extra care to protect your things that may be vulnerable to changes in temperature. Use blankets or towels to double wrap fragile items like glass, dish ware, décor, and electronics. Mark boxes with electronic devices so that the movers will avoid leaving them outside or in the garage for an extended time. These items may need a full day to return to room temperature. Ask your mover for mattress covers to protect mattresses and box springs from the winter elements.

The key to a smooth, stressless move during the Holidays is just like any other time of year. Organization is critical; create a to-do list and stick to it. Download our Ayer Moving and Storage Moving Guides which will help you know what to do when and how to pack like a professional. 

Looking for a Holiday Moving partner, Contact us today! 

 

Holiday Moving Special! 

Five Tips for Holiday Moving

Do You Know What Box to Use? Here are 7 Boxes You’ll Need for Your Next Move

Do You Know What Box to Use? Here are 7 Boxes You’ll Need for Your Next Move

If you are tempted to collect old shipping boxes from friends and neighbors and to get “banana boxes” from the supermarket, here is some advice about specialty boxes you should consider when planning your next move.

These boxes will keep your items safer and cleaner, and you’ll be less likely to have breakage of fragile items.

Mattress Boxes

Heavy and unwieldy, mattresses and box springs can be the most difficult to move. Mattress boxes are available in sizes matched to every type of mattress. They include handles, which make moving them easier on you and your back.

Artwork and Mirror Boxes

You’ll want to protect mirrors and artwork from damage during your move. Artwork and Mirror boxes will hold your items snugly to minimize the risk of the glass cracking. Wrap your décor in bubble wrap and fit them securely inside this specialty box.

Wardrobe Boxes

You will not have to worry about your clothing getting wrinkled and soiled during your move when you use specialty Wardrobe boxes. These boxes are tall and extra sturdy with a rod from which to hang your clothes. When you get to your new home, it’s extra easy to transfer your clothes from the box to your closet.

Electronics Boxes

If you have the original boxes that your computer, printer, and other electronic equipment came in, then you have the best moving box to pack them in.  If you no longer have them, your mover can supply you with strong boxes especially made to keep electronics safe during a move.

Dish Packs

Constructed of corrugated cardboard, Disk Packs are ideal for transporting delicate China and glassware. To avoid breakage, you’ll want to stand your dishes on end or use the cardboard dividers that are supplied with these specialty boxes.

Lamp Boxes

Created and sized to hold one lamp so that it can be wrapped and cushioned on all sides for protection. Depending on size, the lampshade may fit into the same box or two smaller lamps might be packed together.

Traditional Moving Boxes

Available in various sizes, these are versatile and will serve you well for most of your packing needs. You’ll want to obtain some in each of three sizes and be sure to pack appropriately with this in mind: Don’t overpack. Large boxes should be packed less densely than smaller boxes. Remember you’ll be lifting these boxes several times before your move is done!

Large Boxes: These are ideal for bulkier but lighter weight materials like bedding, pillows, or towels.

Medium-sized Boxes: About three cubic feet in size, Medium Boxes hold just about most any 

household items from toys or kitchen utensils, health and beauty products, or home décor.

Small Boxes: Often referred to as Book Boxes because they are perfect for packing books, Small Boxes should be used for small, but heavy items, like canned goods, small appliances, shoes, or CDs.

If you have questions about which boxes to use for what household items, call us at 1-800-233-MOVE. You can also download a copy of our Trade Secrets from the Professional Packers at Ayer Moving and Storage on our website.  

 

Things to Know if You Are Moving to Leominster MA

Things to Know if You Are Moving to Leominster MA

The first thing you need to know if you are moving to Leominster is how to pronounce the name!  No matter how it is spelled, saying “Lee-O-Minster” will just make you stick out as the newbie on the block.  Leominster is correctly pronounced “Lemon-Stir” or as the locals say it: “Lemon-Stuh.”

Leominster has History

If you are moving to Leominster MA, then you need to know a little bit about its history. The name comes from Leominster, Hereforshire, England and the region was originally inhabited by the Pennacook or Nipmuc Native American tribes who lived along the Nashua River as part of the town of Lancaster. European settlers began to settle in the mid-17th century. The Natives and the settlers lived peacefully together until the start of King Philip’s War in 1675. Many hundreds lost their lives and drove the inhabitants from the area.

After the war, the settlers negotiated with Chief Sholan of the Nashaway tribe for the land, the only parcel of land to be legally purchased from the Native Americans in Central Massachusetts.

During the Civil War, Leominster was a major contributor in the Underground Railroad. The Emory Stearn Schoolhouse, and the John Drake Home, led anti-slavery campaigns and helped house fugitive slaves.

An Economic Shift in Leominster

If you are moving to Leominster MA, then you need to know a little bit about its economics. Leominster was mostly a small farming community, but the beginning of the 19th century, brought a shift to manufacturing. A regional transportation hub by 1800, Leominster boasted several turnpikes and connector roads. The opening of the Fitchburg Railroad in 1808 made manufacturing possible with the rail running through North Leominster and into Boston. In addition, the Fitchburg and Worcester Railroad ran through the center of town and by the mid-1800s, paper mills, piano makers, and comb manufacturers were moving to Leominster and established factories along the Monoosnoc Brook and the Nashua River.

The earliest settlers in Leominster were of British ancestry, but soon immigrants were moving to Leominster to work in the factories from Ireland, Canada, and Italy. Leominster became the home of the Dupont Viscoloid Company (plastics), Foster Grant (combs and sunglasses), Tupperware, Standard Tool, and the Whitney Carriage Company (baby carriages), among others.

Leominster is a Plastic Town

If you are moving to Leominster MA, then you need to know it is famous for plastics. Perhaps the most famous company in Leominster (other than Tupperware) was the Union Products Company, maker of the popular pink flamingo lawn ornament. Although the Great Depression slowed the plastic industry in Leominster and in recent years manufacturing in general has moved out of the city, Leominster will always be remembered as Plastic Town.

The second largest city in Worcester County, Leominster in 2018 had a population of 41,823.  The city is divided into several small villages known as French Hill, originally inhabited by French immigrants; Morse Hollow, North Leominster, Rice Hill, the Flats, the Bowery, the West Side, and the Car Barn area, located along the Fitchburg order. The Car Barn Area got its name because the Fitchburg & Leominster Railway trolley cars were stored in this area.

Leominster has a City Government

Leominster is governed by a Mayor and City Council. City Hall is located at 25 West Street and its operating hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday 8:30 am to 4:00 pm. Thursdays City Hall is open 8:30 am to 5:30 am. City Departments include the Assessor’s Office, Collector & Treasurer, Comptroller, Parking Clerk, Planning & Development, Purchasing, Weights & Measures, and the Retirement Board.

If you are moving to Leominster, you’ll want to visit the Leominster Public Library, located at 30 West Street. Because of Covid-19, the library is open for limited hours for browsing. Call 978-534-752 for updated information.

Leominster has Great Schools

If you are moving to Leominster MA the educational system there is important to you. There are thirteen public schools in Leominster. Bennett School and Lincoln School are Pre-school; Fall Brook, Frances Drake, Johnny Appleseed, Northwest School, and Priest Street School are Elementary schools; Samoset School and Sky View are Middle Schools; and the Center for Technology Education and Innovation as Leominster Center for Excellence are High Schools.

What to Do in Leominster?

Leominster is a bustling city with fine schools and lots to do. In Part II of our series on Things to Know if You Are Moving to Leominster MA will introduce Johnny Appleseed and why Leominster claims him as their own, as well as features on the culture, night-life, and happenings in Leominster.

 

Should you use your Attic for Storage? The Answer is No, and Here's Why...

Should you use your Attic for Storage? The Answer is No, and Here’s Why…

Should you use your attic for storage? The Answer is No, and Here’s Why You May Want to Think Twice.

Our home collects our memories, our travels and sometimes a lot of our belongings. After some time, the spaces begin to fill up and we look for storage in every room and every corner. We see places such as our basements and attics as perfect storage rooms for our clothes and holiday decorations. Although putting boxes away is great for keeping your home clean and organized, storing them in your attic is more dangerous then you may think.

Here is what a roofer would say when asked if one should store items in their attic.

The answer: No. Do not ever store items in your attic space. The reason is linked with your home’s insulation and ventilation.

First let me explain what role your attic plays in your roof’s life expectancy. The attic is the heart and lifeline of your roof. A well ventilated and insulated attic will assist the roof in providing protection from the crazy New England weather. Attic ventilation works on the principle that heated air naturally rises, primarily utilizing two types of vents:

Intake vents, located at the lowest part of the roof under the eaves, allow cool air to enter the attic. Hot air exhaust vents, located at the peak of the roof, allow hot air to escape.

Taking advantage of this natural process, referred to as passive ventilation, is the most common way to vent an attic. In order to facilitate this exchange of warm and cool air, the general rule of thumb suggests installing at least 1 sq.ft. of vent for every 300 sq.ft. of attic floor. Building codes vary, though, so check with your local building authority for the specifics that pertain to your community.

The way the attic is kept cool by its air intake in the eves of the attic and its air outtake in the ridge and peak of the attic room reduces the danger of iced dams, and unwanted leaks that can lead to rot and decay of your home’s wood and plywood.

Where do homeowners go wrong?

Many fall short when they decide to use their attic as a storage room. Using your attic as storage disrupts the process of attic ventilation and causes potential ice dams.

When we get a call for a leak in the winter months due to an ice dam, the first place we inspect is the interior of the attic. When we arrive in the attic and find that it is covered in boxes we know exactly what caused the leak and the ice dam in the first place.

The boxes of clothes in the attic have disturbed the air flow and have contributed to the cause of the ice dams. The boxes of holiday ornaments have been pressed up against the insulation which has also caused the insulation to lose its R value. (An insulating material’s resistance to conductive heat flow is measured or rated in terms of its thermal resistance or R-value — the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating effectiveness. The R-value depends on the type of insulation, its thickness, and its density.)

The boxes in the attic have added to the condensation, moisture and potential mold to the attic walls.
The boxes in the attic have allowed the hot and cold air to reach your roofing shingles. When asphalt shingles are met with hot and cold air it causes the shingle to prematurely age and lose a lot of their asphalt granulares.

These four reasons should make you question if it is even worth considering the attic as a storage room. Is it worth dealing with an ice dam or the risk of mold in the attic? Is it worth it to potentially premature age your roof because ventilation has been compromised?

The answer: No. Always no. It is not worth it. It is much wiser to have your belongings in designated closets or a storage facility then to cause issues for you and your home. There are several options for off-site storage, including in a temperature-controlled storage warehouse, a self-storage unit, or in a Container on Wheels ® (COW) for temporary storage.

As a roofer, we recommend that you always store in your home’s closets, or in a storage facility. Keep your attic floor clean and free of clutter.

Let the attic be an attic. This advice may save you thousands of dollars and a lot of unwanted leaks.and headaches.

10 Ways to Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic

10 Ways to Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic

Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic.

Small businesses have had to endure a lot since the beginning of the pandemic known as Covid-19.  Retail stores, restaurants, hair and nail salons, and recreational venues were closed and now that they are allowed to open, have to limit the number of patrons to conform to social distancing rules. Some businesses can’t hire staff because some people are afraid they will get sick if they go back to work.

When we support local business, we are supporting the local economy. Now is the time to help small businesses who need our patronage now more than ever. Here are some ways to do just that.

Support Local Businesses by Shopping Local

Look first to your local retailers – hardware stores, pharmacies, groceries, shoe stores, clothing boutiques, liquor stores. Don a mask and visit the stores for what you need. Check to see if they offer online selling with pickup or delivery service.

You can find local businesses to support by visiting your local Chambers of Commerce.

Some local chambers in our Area include:

North Central MA Chamber of Commerce

Nashoba Valley Chamber of Commerce

Marlborough Regional Chamber of Commerce

Worcester Area Chamber of Commerce

Support Local Businesses by Shopping locally online

Whether it is a retail store, supermarket, or restaurant, you can order online and then arrange for pick up or delivery.

To shop small local eEommerce stores visit over 2592 all over America on PRIVY.com

Support Local Businesses by Purchasing Gift Cards

Buy now and plan to use your gift cards later or for an online purchase. Your purchase helps keep cash flowing and doors open.

Buy Local Gift Cards from the North Central MA Region Today!

Support Local Businesses by Being a Generous Tipper

Wait staff depend on tips as their hourly rate is lower than you think. When there are fewer customers, the daily or weekly take-home takes a hit. Be generous and apply a larger than normal percentage to your tab for a tip.

Become a Discount Shopper Locally

If you haven’t yet discovered the joy of getting a bargain, be on the lookout for small businesses that are offering steep discounts to boost revenue. Purchase larger than normal quantities of sale items and you’ll be helping to keep a small business in business.

Order Local Restaurant Fare for Take Out

Preparing three meals a day at home can be a daunting task. Take a break and order take out for curb service or home delivery. Many restaurants are offering a limited menu at discounted pricing. You can order direct or through a food delivery service like UberEats.com or DoorDash.com. If the weather is nice and your favorite restaurant has outside table service, consider going out to eat.

Support Local Businesses and your Experiences on Social Media

Give your favorite stores and restaurants a “high five” by posting a review on social media. Whether you like standard review sites like yelp.com or reviews on the business Facebook page or if you enjoy snapping a photo of your food or purchase, the business will appreciate and benefit from the free exposure.

Keep Up Your Local Memberships if You Can

Even if you can’t attend the gym or class that was cancelled or live performance that didn’t happen, consider donating the cost to the business. If you had season tickets and half the season was cancelled, donate the unused portion rather than request a refund. These small donations will go a long way to ensuring a business or not-for-profit will be there next season when things are hopefully back to normal.

Many local businesses play it very “close to the vest” and will not be able to withstand several months with no or little revenue. Selecting one or more of the tips above, will not only be appreciated and remembered, it might be the difference between an OPEN or CLOSED sign in the months to come.

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19. These are challenging times and if you need a solution for storing household belongings now during COVID-19, you want to be sure that precautions are being taken for your safety when dealing with your storage facility.

Storage Options with Safety First in Mind

This global Pandemic has spawned creative and practical ways to deal with and expand upon the CDC guidelines for safety. At Ayer Moving and Storage your health and safety and the safety of our employees are our highest priority. We screen our moving crew for symptoms. We have hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes on board all our trucks. We have increased our daily cleaning procedures for shared, high-touch surfaces on our trucks, equipment, in our storage, dispatch, and office areas. No-contact arrangements are made by phone so there is no need to go into the office. We also complete a short COVID-19 questionnaire prior to every job.

Everyone involved is required to wear a mask whether in the warehouse or storage unit and it is now the norm to maintain social distancing of six feet or more. In addition, we only use “clean” pens and are liberal in the use of disinfectant spray and/or wipes.

Reasons Why You May Need a Storage Options as a Solution


You may not have extra space at home to store household items you want and need, but don’t use very often, including seasonal clothing, outgrown toys, electronics, furniture, or valuable artwork.

You’ll need extra storage when your college student is home and dorm furnishings and décor need a place temporarily. The same is true for Military service members who require short- or long-term storage.

Business or household paperwork or tax records that you are required by law to keep for years can be safely stored in a storage unit.

Do you have a sports car or antique vehicle that you want to safely store over the winter months? Or perhaps you have an RV that you need to move out of your driveway or backyard.

Out of season recreational vehicles – a boat, ATV, jet-ski, or motorcycle can be put away in a storage facility.

If you are selling your home and need to remove furnishings to stage it properly or if you have sold your home, but are not yet ready to move to your new house, a storage facility is the ideal solution.

Types of Storage Options Available

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19 Warehouse StorageA temperature-controlled warehouse is perfect for long- or short-term storage. Your belongings can be picked up at your home and loaded onto a truck that will deliver them to the warehouse. There everything is packed into crates or loaded onto shelves. Ayer Moving and Storage offers 20,000 sq. ft. of warehouse where you can store a little or a lot.

 

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19 Self-Storage UnitsThese handy units come in various sizes and are available for monthly rentals. You bring your belongings to the unit store them inside yourself. You can bring in additional items and/or remove some when you need them. You supply your own lock so you, alone, have a key to your unit and can access it according to the facility’s schedule and hours of operation. You can cover your belongings with thick sheets of plastic, or bubble wrap and use plywood or boards to place between layers of stacked items.

 

 

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19 Containers on Wheels – Ayer Moving and Storage offers COWs (Containers on Wheels) for temporary or long-term storage on your property or ours. COWs are lockable and weatherproof, steel-constructed containers that we deliver to your driveway. Ideal for use in-between moves or if you are doing renovation and need a place for furnishings until the job is complete. Available in 8’ or 16’ containers and can be rented daily, weekly, or monthly.

If you are planning a local do-it-yourself move, you can pack up your COW and when you are ready to move, we’ll load it onto our truck and deliver it to your new home.

For more information about storage options at Ayer Moving and Storage, call 800-233-MOVE or email. (info@ayermoving.com)

Cleaning Tips for both Moving In and Moving Out of Your Home

Cleaning Tips for both Moving In and Moving Out of Your Home

Cleaning Tips for Moving and Out of your Home. When getting ready to sell your home, you’ll want to be sure that it shows well once it is listed for sale. Your moving house cleaning should be as methodical as purging and packing and can be accomplished in conjunction with these other tasks.

These are areas that you need to focus on so that once your household is packed and loaded on the moving van, you won’t have a lot of last-minute cleaning chores to complete. We’ve put together some tips that use common baking soda and/or vinegar as cleaning agents that will leave your home clean and fresh without the need for harsh chemicals.

Cleaning Tips for Moving Out

Kitchen

Buyers look closely at the kitchen and every appliance and countertop in it. Kitchens are very important to prospective buyers and need to be cleaned carefully before and after the sale.

Stovetop and Oven.

Brush off any debris with a brush and sprinkle the surface with baking soda. Then spray with hydrogen peroxide. Wipe clean with a sponge and cool water after the solution sits for several minutes. Your oven can be cleaned with a paste you make from equal parts baking soda and water. Let this sit overnight and then wipe the paste away with a damp cloth. If there is residue of baking soda, spray with vinegar, which will make the paste fizz up. You should be able to wipe it away easily. If your oven has a self-cleaning option, use it to remove burned-on food. Don’t forget to clean exhaust fans.

Drawers and Cabinets.

Remove drawer and shelf liners and sprinkle surfaces with a little baking soda, wiping with a damp sponge. Stains or caked-on foods on cabinet doors can be removed with Murphy’s Oil Soap, an all-natural cleaner.

Refrigerator.

When ready to move, clear out everything and spray all surfaces inside and out with a solution of equal parts water and vinegar. Wipe with a damp cloth and dry thoroughly with a clean towel. Defrost the freezer, if needed, and clean in the same manner as the refrigerator. Move the appliance out a bit and clean behind, under, and around it. Last minute: unplug the unit and leave the door ajar.

Dishwasher.

Clean by using a recommended product while running the dishwasher. Repair or replace any broken utensil holders or racks.

Countertops.

Fill a spray bottle with water and white vinegar (equal parts). Add a few drops of your favorite essential oil and wipe down the counters.

Sink.

Use the same solution you mixed up for the counters and wipe out the sink. If you have a garbage disposal, pour ½ cup baking soda into the disposal drain, followed by 1 cup of white vinegar. Let the solution soak for a few minutes. Then rinse with water while turning on the disposal for a few seconds.

Flooring.

Sweep floors, being sure to go under appliances. Then do a quick mop with warm water. If floors need a more thorough cleaning, use a product recommended for your specific flooring. When selling the home, floors need to sparkle. When moving, a quick sweep and mop is sufficient.

Bathrooms

Shower and Tub.

Here again, the baking soda and water paste will do the trick to clean out soap and dirt residue. Apply the paste, scrub the surfaces, and then follow with a spritz of vinegar until it fizzes. Scrub again when the fizzing stops. Finish with a final rinse with water.

Sinks.

Sprinkle baking soda onto the sink and rub it in with a soft cloth. Then rinse with cool water.

Mirrors.

Mix 1part vinegar and 4 parts water to wipe all mirrors and fixtures.

Toilets.

Pour a mixture of ½ cup vinegar and 1 tablespoon of baking soda. Let it sit for 30 minutes and then scrub with a toilet brush.

Floors.

Sweep and mop with a solution of ¼ cup vinegar, 1 tablespoon of dish soap, and 2 gallons water. Use a towel to wipe down floors with this mixture.

Living Areas

Walls.

Remove any nails or screws and plaster the holes using spackling paste with a putty knife. When dry, lightly sand and touch up paint. Remove any scuff marks with a Magic Eraser. Cover a broom with a towel and wipe the walls from ceiling to baseboard to catch any cobwebs. Don’t forget to dust and wipe windowsills clean too.

Doors.

Wipe down doors and knobs with a few drops of dish soap in water. You can add ½ cup vinegar (to 3 cups of water) and mix in a few drops of dish soap and essential oil.

Light Fixtures, Ceiling Fans, Switches, Outlets. Dust and use a microfiber cloth sprayed with your cleaning solution (see Doors).

Vents.

Use a vacuum attachment to vacuum up any dust, dog hair or dirt. Wipe with the microfiber cloth and the same spray used to clean light fixtures.

Drapes.

Use an upholstery brush and crevice tool to vacuum drapery to rid it of dust and dirt. If more cleaning is needed, consider dry cleaning and re-installing.

Carpet Stains.

Use 1part vinegar mixed with 2 parts water. Dip a rag in the mixture and then place it over the stain. Heat an iron to the steam setting and iron on top of the rag for about 30 seconds. If the stain doesn’t come up, you may need a commercial carpet stain remover.

Garage.

Clean any ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, and any built-in shelving or cabinets. Vacuum or sweep out the area. Clean garage floor stains by scrubbing with a stiff brush, detergent, and degreaser. Be sure to leave the garage completely empty unless other arrangements have been made with the buyers.

If you’ve taken care of all this beforehand, when the movers have loaded the van, you can do a quick dusting, vacuum, and mop to greet the new owners with a clean home.

Cleaning Tips for Moving In

Once you are on the road to your new home, you can turn your attention to what needs to be done to make it ready to welcome you and your family in comfort. The amount of cleaning you’ll need to do will depend on whether your new home is a newly built house or one that is a resale.

Kitchen

Cabinets, Drawers, Counters. Wipe down all surfaces with a disinfectant spray and add lining where desired.

Dishwasher.

Pour a cup of white vinegar into a dishwasher-safe container and place it on the top rack of your dishwasher while running it through one cycle.

Refrigerator and Stove.

Remove all stove-top grills and refrigerator shelves and drawers. Soak them for an hour in a tub of warm, soapy water. Remove, dry, and put back in place. Prevent odors in the refrigerator by placing an open box of baking soda or a tray of fresh or used coffee grounds in the back corner. Replace every two- to four-weeks.
Bathroom
Toilets. If desired, replace toilet seats and covers to ensure a clean, fresh start. Otherwise, wipe down surfaces with a disinfectant. Do the same for all other surfaces.

Sweep, dust, vacuum, and/or mop as needed throughout the home to your satisfaction.

Hopefully, the former owners of your new home have done as good a job cleaning before they left as you did. Now that you’ve done your move-in cleaning, you are ready to celebrate being in your new home and are ready to tackle the next job: unpacking!

How to Make Your Cross-Country Move Less Stressful

How to Make Your Cross-Country Move Less Stressful

You don’t need to be told that the more things you take with you, the more work you’ll have to do and the more expensive it will be. Therefore, the first tip to make your cross-country move less stressful is to reduce and declutter!

Downsize to De-stress

Attack one room at a time and use a sticky note to label items you use every day, those you use less frequently, and those you hardly ever use.

For those items you seldom or never use (or wear), make three piles: Items to sell; items to give away; and items to discard.

Check the condition of everything. If you are thinking of moving a five-year-old couch that has seen better days, you might consider donating it to a charitable organization and purchasing a new one once you are settled.

Consider having a yard sale or listing your items on your local Facebook Marketplace, or freecycle, OfferUp, Letgo, or Ebay.  For those items that are to be discarded, think about renting a dumpster through a company like BinThereDumpThat. They will deliver a household-sized dumpster to your driveway and pick it up when you have finished your cleanout.

Organize to a Fault

Use a moving checklist which gives you a detailed description and timeline for what you need to do to prepare for your move and tips for during and after your move.

Make an inventory of everything you are shipping to your new home, room by room. Your mover will also make an inventory, but it is prudent to have your own to compare.

Use technology to assist in making your inventory list easier. Check out the app from MoveAdvisor-Home Inventory, which gives you a detailed digital map of your home into which you can place all the furnishings you are planning to move. Sortly allows you to create a virtual inventory of all your items.

Timing is Everything

Speak with your moving company about the best time to undertake a cross-country move with regards to peak and off-peak seasons. Mid-month, mid-week, and off season moves will mean better scheduling to meet your needs and lower costs.

Be sure to consult the weather predictions a few days before your move is to begin. If bad weather is in store, you and your mover can prepare a back-up plan.

Begin Planning Early

Once you’ve decided to move, begin to interview prospective movers who are experienced in long-distance moving. You want to be sure to ask for a free, no-obligation quote that includes an in-home visit (adhering to current Covid-19 precautions) or a detailed telephone quote. You will need to be prepared at that point to know precisely what you are moving and communicate that to your prospective mover. Remember to discuss the different options regarding insurance and ask about the travel arrangements. Will there be an overnight stop along the way? What if there are delays?

Packing – Who and with What?

You have options regarding the packing procedure for your move. You can do it all. You can have your mover do all the packing … or you can split the process by doing the clothing and household items and have your mover pack electronics, art, and items that need special care.

Your mover has many types and sizes of moving boxes available and may even have used ones to sell at a discounted rate. There are some items that can be shipped in grocery or department store boxes but be wary of using boxes that are inappropriate in size or weight that will not protect your items adequately. There are specialty boxes for lamps, dinnerware, electronics, wall art, and TVs as well as wardrobe boxes in which you can hang clothing.

You can also purchase unprinted newsprint paper from your mover or stationery store … paper that won’t soil your items like used newspaper will. You can also use towels and linens to wrap fragile items.

Label each box with the room and a summary of what is in the box. Make a copy to put IN the box as well as one to tape onto the box.

For a detailed guide to packing that you can download, visit our website.

Coordinate Your Travel

You will need to plan your travel arrangements to mesh with your mover so that you, your family, and your household arrive at your destination together. Consider where you will stay until your mover arrives. What will be the ETA of the truck and how long will it take to unload? If you are traveling with pets, children, or seniors, what special considerations are necessary? A pet-friendly hotel? A sitter to keep the children occupied while the movers are loading and/or unloading? A caretaker and comfortable waiting space with food and water?

Ask Questions

An experienced long-distance mover will have the answers to your questions. Don’t be afraid to depend on their expertise if you have concerns. The best way to alleviate stress is to have confidence in your mover who is your partner in this very important and exciting venture.

Related Blog Post: Cleaning Tips for Moving In and Out of Your Home!

How to Make Your Cross-Country Move Less Stressful

7 Ways to Feel at Home in Your New Apartment

7 Ways to Feel at Home in Your New Apartment

Moving into your own apartment can be very exciting … your new space is a blank canvas that you can make yours by simply adding one element:  PERSONALITY!

You want to make it yours; to add the sparkle that is a reflection of you; to transform your apartment into a home. The Danish call it HYGGE, pronounced “hue-guh,” meaning cozy, comfortable, and contented.

Here are some steps you can take to convert your generic white-walled residence into your very own personal haven.

  1. Clean it! Before you do anything else, a deep clean is in order. Give yourself a fresh start by scrubbing away the remnants of the past tenants. The bonus is that while cleaning you’ll get familiar with every nook and cranny of your new apartment and it will begin to feel familiar.
  2. Paint it! If permissible, select a wall color that is more “you.” Without spending a lot of money, you can change the look and feel of your space with just a coat or two of paint. You can simply paint an accent wall or change the entire color scheme of the apartment to suit your personality.
  3. Light it! The right lighting design can turn a drab space into a comfortable and functional one. Lighting should be planned for function so that you have the appropriate amount and type of light for the area. Where will you relax with a book? Will you have a specific area for your computer work? What color bulbs are best for the bedroom? Visit lighting stores and ask the experts or do a bit of research on the Internet.
  4. Decorate it! Bring out the knick-knacks, throw pillows, and wall art that you treasure and find the best space to display them. Sentimental items like a hand-crocheted blanket, a favorite photo or painting, or a souvenir from your travels will instantly bring your apartment to life and give it a dose of hygge.
  5. Hang it! It’s important to bring a sense of privacy to your new home. Bare widows need to be dressed to give your apartment a feeling of completeness. Whether you choose curtains, drapes, or simply valences depends on your style. The object is to create unity with your furniture and décor.
  6. Frame it! Unpack photos of friends and family. Put some on a bookshelf or use magnets to affix them to your refrigerator. Create a montage of photos on an accent wall. Nothing makes a house a home faster than some familiar faces.
  7. Throw it! Invite friends and family over for drinks and a bite to eat. Planning a party will get your kitchen in order and will get you emotionally connected to your new apartment. Your place will feel warm and cozy when filled with those you love. A party of this type, you know, is called a “house-warming” for this very reason.

Follow these guidelines and your new apartment will feel cozy and comfortable in no time!

Ayer Moving and Storage has resources to help you with your move and our Relocation Specialists can give you tips on saving money. Call us at (800) 233-6683 or visit our website for more information.

A Baker’s Dozen Tips for Saving Money on Your Move

A Baker’s Dozen Tips for Saving Money on Your Move

No doubt about it.  Moving can be expensive. There are many tips for saving money when you move, but some come with a caution. You may be saving some dollars, but you could also be risking the safety of your belongings and bringing more work and stress on yourself in the bargain. Consider these money-saving tips and the adverse consequences that may occur.

Get a Moving Quote.

Call two or three movers and invite them to come to your home to prepare a moving estimate. When professional movers see your home and the items you want to take with you, your estimate will include all the necessary charges and you won’t be low-balled or be greeted with an unpleasant surprise when the move is complete. This will enable movers to see that there are narrow stairs to the third floor, or you have a piano that needs special attention. They will record each piece of furniture to be moved and its approximate weight so your estimate will be as accurate as possible. Only then will you be able to compare one mover with another.

Be Organized.

Take advantage of moving guides available from your mover so you don’t overlook crucial steps in the moving process. You’ll want to pay special attention to the timeline of what to do when, as the process can involve more time than you might think, especially if you haven’t moved before. You can request free moving and packing guides from Ayer Moving and Storage.

Inventory Prior to the Move.

Don’t wait until you are ready to pack. See if members of your family or friends want anything you really don’t need. Sell items at a yard sale. Dispose of things that are no longer useful. Donate items to charities and if you itemize on your tax return, take a deduction for their value.

Be Flexible with the Moving Date.

Movers are typically slow in the winter months or in the middle of the week or month. You may be able to save a bit by being flexible. (The months of July and August are peak times for moving companies and they are usually booked way in advance.)

Do Your Own Packing.

You can find many tips for packing your own possessions, including collectibles, antiques, electronics, and clothing online. Keep in mind that professional packers know the precise ways in which to pack and have the appropriate packing materials on hand, including bubble wrap, plain newsprint, and special sized boxes. Compare the costs and the time involved before you decide to do it yourself.

Free Moving Boxes.

Sturdy boxes are available free from liquor stores, university bookstores, and supermarkets (find out when they typically flatten boxes or incinerate them so you can pick them up beforehand!)  Moving companies also sell used packing boxes and specialty boxes for wall art, dishes, and wardrobes.

Go online.

Purchase plain (inkless) newsprint and bubble wrap from discount stores like Staples or Amazon. Or check out used packing materials on Facebook Marketplace or Craig’s List. (When your move is complete you can list your used packing materials for sale!)

Consider Sharing the Packing.

You may want to pack certain things yourself but leave the large furniture and special items like artwork, computers, dishes, and collectibles to the professionals.

Pack Like Russian Dolls.

Conserve space by packing small items inside larger items to save on moving boxes. Don’t overpack, though, as you run the risk of heavy boxes being dropped or bursting under the strain.

Use Linens to Pack.

Make use of towels and blankets to wrap around fragile items and to cushion items against each other.

Solicit Friends for Moving Day.

Ask friends and neighbors to help you load the moving truck and treat them to pizza and libations (after the job is done)! Be sure to plan who is to do what and how you want the loading to be accomplished. Otherwise, you risk having boxes loaded incorrectly which can result in crushing or breaking your treasures.

Rent a COW.

A Container on Wheels (COW) is a portable storage unit that can be loaded in your driveway and then hitched to your local mover’s truck to go to your new home.

Rent a truck, Load, and Drive It.

 

This can save you a bundle, but you may not be ready or able to take on this huge task. Ask your local mover if you can rent a truck from them, along with a crew to load it. Then you can drive to your new location on your own. (You’ll need to arrange for help on the other end!)

Don’t skimp on moving insurance coverage. You’ll want to talk to your mover about purchasing insurance in addition to the coverage that is included with the move, which pays on claims according to the weight of the item, not its value. It is key to have this insurance on anything that might break during the move.

Ayer Moving and Storage has resources to help you with your move and their Relocation Specialists can give you tips on saving money. Call us at (800) 233-6683 or visit our website for more information.