Top Ten Reasons for Moving

Top Ten Reasons for Moving

“Being the owner of a moving and storage company and a NorthAmerican Van Lines Agent that had its start in 1951, I’ve heard a lot of reasons why people move from one location to another,” said Karen Strickland, President of Ayer Moving and Storage.

Some reasons for moving are because parents may need to uproot their families because of a new job. Others need a larger home or desire a better neighborhood. In fact, according to the US Census Bureau, between 2012 and 2013, about 36 million Americans moved to a new home.

Traditionally, the average American will move about 11 times in their lifetime. What are the reasons for moving that often? Why would someone choose to move that many times? Here is a list of the top 10 reasons:

To change jobs and relocate to a new area

Many people move every few years due to a change in employment – the industry, position, or type of company.  Some may have been transferred by their employer to another corporate location.

To seek out a new school district

Those with school-age children may seek out a new or different school district, which is an important deciding factor when selecting a new home.

Needing more or less space

When the family grows or the number of square feet in the home no longer meets the homeowners needs, it may be time to move. If the children have grown and moved away, it may be time to downsize to a smaller home or condo or apartment.

A change of scenery

Perhaps the home, itself, is fine, but the homeowners want to change where they live. It may be that they no longer want to experience the long, cold winters. Or the summer heat has become unbearable.  Others may want to be closer to shopping, public transportation, entertainment venues, or beaches.

A change in lifestyle or relationships

A marriage, divorce, remarriage, illness, or death may necessitate a move to another home. If a loved one needs caregiving, a move to a relative’s home or to a senior living community may be required.

A change from renter to home buyer (or vice-versa)

Some people who have been renting are ready to purchase a home. Others who have been homeowners are ready to scale back and leave maintenance and lawn care behind.

A change from the city to the suburbs (or vice-versa)

City apartment dwellers may want to live in a home in the suburbs with a backyard in a quiet neighborhood with less traffic and congestion.  Others may be looking for nearby shopping, theaters, restaurants, pubs, and the nightlife typical of life in the city.

To benefit from the equity in the current home

Today real estate prices are high and many decide to move in order to sell at a high price and cash in on the built-up equity in the home. They may use this equity to buy in an area with a lower cost-of-living or purchase a less expensive condo.

Changes in Migration

In late 2020, research showed that Americans were moving at the lowest rate since the Census Bureau began tracking mobility and migration in 1947. There were a variety of reasons for this slowing … from the population aging to younger people not moving because of the high cost of living and starting families later than prior generations.

Because of financial challenges

When job loss, furloughs, or other financial challenges occur, homeowners, rather than falling behind on payments or risk foreclosure, may sell their homes and relocate to smaller, more affordable homes.

The impact of CoVID-19

 According to a July 2020 Pew Research study,  20% of the adults in the US said they moved, had someone move in with them, or knew someone who moved as a result of the Pandemic. The reasons were:

They were no longer able to afford their rent or mortgage payments.
They felt unsafe in their city or town.
Their college and/or college housing closed.
They lost their jobs.
Financially-independent individuals moved from densely-populated cities into suburbs and countryside.

No matter the reasons for moving, it is clear that Americans continue to be “on the move.” If you have questions about your upcoming move, call Ayer Moving and Storage at (800) 233-6683 or email one of their Relocation Specialists.

Successful Move Hacks

Successful Move Hacks

It’s a known fact that moving is one of the most stressful events in life. According to Verified Movers, the average American family moves 11 times in their lifetime!  Whether your family is below or above that average, these successful move hacks will help you reduce the stress the next time you move.

Getting Prepared for a Successful Move

Start early. Don’t wait for the last few weeks prior to moving day to do what needs to be done.

Set a moving budget and seek out movers to compare services and scheduling.

Take advantage of an online moving cost calculator (moving.com) which will give you a heads-up for what to expect in cost.

Call your utility companies to advise them of your moving date. Get this out of the way so you won’t forget to do it later!

Plan the packing supplies you will need, including specialty boxes for mattresses, framed artwork, electronic devices, and tableware.

Getting Decluttered for a Successful Move

Organize your belongings in three categories: What to move, what to offer to other family members or sell, what to donate to charity, and what to toss.

  • Start with the closets. Don’t take it with you if it is out of style, doesn’t fit, or you haven’t worn it in a year.
  • Ask yourself if you would buy an item again. If not, you don’t need to move it.
  • Call charities to make donation pick up arrangements.
  • Consider short-term storage to stage your home for sale or to hold items you are not yet sure you want to move.

Getting Packed

The most time-consuming part of the moving process is the actual packing. You may want to consider hiring the mover to pack things safely and securely for you or you may want to divide the task with them to save money. In either case, follow these time saving tips when packing:

Don’t empty dresser drawers.

You can leave your decluttered drawers in the dresser if they are not too heavy. If weight is an issue, take the drawer out and wrap it in shipping plastic wrap.

Leaving hanging clothes on hangers.

Obtain wardrobe boxes from your mover so you can easily rehang your clothes from box to closet when you reach your new home.

Use linens and towels as packing materials.

Wrap fragile items in paper or bubble wrap and cushion them with sheets or towels. Wrap linens around hard to wrap items, like lamps and vases.

Use pots.

Save space by filling large pots and other sealable containers with small kitchen items, like spice jars and gadgets.

Prevent spills.

Wrap a small piece of plastic wrap to secure the lids of lotions, liquid soap, shampoo … or put them in a plastic zip lock bag.

Pack suitcases.

Useful for packing items that may not easily be transported in boxes, suitcases with wheels can be used for books or large serving dishes.

Color code boxes with stickers, one color designated for each room.

It’s also helpful to tape a list to the box, indicating what’s inside, so you don’t have to open multiple boxes when hunting for something. A photo of the inside contents is also helpful for a general idea of what’s inside.

Take helpful photos.

Take a picture of the back of your TV or the connections for any electronic device. While still plugged in, a photo can show which cable goes where so you’ll remember how to set it up in your new home.

A Necessary Bag is necessary.

Pack a small bag with the items you’ll need to access during the move and immediately upon arrival at your new place: important documents, medications, jewelry, basic toiletries, a change of clothes, and a favorite toy for each of the kids. Take this bag with you.

The goal is to be fully packed the day before the move. When the movers arrive, you want to be free to focus on overseeing the loading process, not scurrying around with last-minute packing.

Getting on the Road

Plan for the children and pets on moving day. Can they stay with friends or family to keep them entertained and safe? Arrange for them and for family pets to give you piece of mind where they are concerned.

Once ready to leave, have a few essentials for the road trip. Pack a cooler and stock it with water bottles and quick snacks.

Getting Unpacked from your Successful Move

The task of unpacking can seem overwhelming. You won’t procrastinate with these guidelines:

Start with the kitchen.

Getting the kitchen up and running is an accomplishment which allows you to focus on the easier to unpack rooms

The bedrooms are next.

Get the beds set up and made up so when you are ready for bed, the beds will be ready for you.

Establish a deadline.

Make a plan for unpacking each room by a certain date. Scheduling a house-warming party or a casual get-together gives you a goal for getting it done.

Recycle boxes immediately.

As soon as a box is emptied, break it down and recycle it or offer it to other soon-to-be-movers.

Play music while unpacking!

The TV can be a distraction, so opt for music to entertain yourself and the children while putting things in place.

Don’t stress over trying to get everything unpacked right away. Do what you can when you can and it will get done. Give the children tasks they can handle. Take breaks; order take-out food. Take time to enjoy your new home as it is taking shape.

Follow these moving hacks and you’ll make things easier on yourself and have less stress in the process.

If you have questions about making your next successful move, or what happens before, during, or after a move, call the Relocation Specialists at Ayer Moving and Storage at (800) 233-6683 or email.

Stress-Free Packing for a Move

Stress-Free Packing for a Move

Stress-free packing for a move is part science, part art … there are right ways and wrong ways to pack dishes, electronic devices, books, and artwork.  There are specialty boxes and packing materials recommended for this precise activity.  The order in which you pack is essential.

There is also an order to packing that can help make moving as stress-free as possible. Before you even begin to pack, you should take inventory of your belongings. Take a walk through your home with notebook and pen in hand. Bring a cup of coffee or your favorite drink with you. This can take time.

As you go through the inventory process, note the items you will NOT be taking with you. Whatever you no longer use, things that have been in the back of the closet for years, clothes that no longer fit, hobbies or sports you no longer participate in … these are all categories for the decluttering process. It is senseless (and costly) to pack and move items that you won’t be using in your new home.  Sort these unwanted items into four categories: give to family or friends, sell, donate, or trash. 

Clean and dust items before packing them so you don’t have to do this when unpacking … when you are most eager to set up your new home. Now onto packing.

What Comes First? Stress-Free Packing for a Move

Start with the least used room.

Perhaps this room is the garage, basement, attic, or spare bedroom. Determine which room in your home is the least used and begin the packing process there.

Pack items that are in storage.

Organize and pack the items you have in a storage room in your home. First check for items you may no longer need or want. Towels and sheets in your linen closet can be packed, except for one set of each to put in your “open me first” box. See below.

Pack the most difficult room.

While this room may be used often, like a children’s playroom, you don’t want to save it for last, as you may be all tired out by the time you get to it. You want to give it the attention it deserves and not rush the process just because it is the last one on your list. If it is the children’s playroom, don’t pack it up entirely; leave some of the favorite toys and games out and save a box for these items to pack just before moving day. If it is a bedroom, don’t pack all your clothing! Pack what you don’t think you’ll need until after the move and keep a box handy for last-minute bedroom items to pack just before the big day.

Pack out of season items.

If you’ve already tackled the attic or basement, then you may have gotten to the holiday décor. If there are items that are only used seasonally, pack them now as you won’t need them until you are in your new location.

Books, music, and décor come next.

Items hanging on the wall that are purely aesthetic can be packed early on in the process. Artwork, wall décor, and knick-knacks fall into this category. (See our blog on how to pack art.) Books, magazines, and music also are in this group … only be sure to go through them to toss or give away magazines already read. Do the same with no longer playable music tapes, CDs, video games, or DVDs. Unwanted books can be donated to your local library.  Moving books that you have read or will probably never read is expensive – they are heavy and your move expenses are based on weight! 

Shoes and Jewelry

Leave out the shoes and jewelry you most often wear and pack the rest. See our blog on how best to pack your shoes.

Room-by-Room

Begin packing the rest of the rooms, using the same process.  First pack those items that are non-essential, things not needed day to day. Then, pack the rest of the items, leaving out the absolute essential items you will need as soon as you get to your new home.

Stress-Free Packing for a Move: Packing Up Essential Items

If you’ve packed up most of your non-essential items, you can begin packing those items you will need as soon as you are at your new location and move in. 

Kitchen essentials

Not everything in your kitchen is needed every day. You can go without many things for a week or two. You can cook most meals using just one skillet, one pot, and a spatula.  Most of everything else can be packed now.

Keep your coffee maker on hand until the last day, but you can pack your air fryer, instant-pot, and waffle maker! Use disposable plates, bowls and plastic knives, forks, and spoons so that you can pack up your dishes and utensils now.

Pack up non-perishable food in your pantry that you won’t expire any time soon. Try to consume as much as possible between now and your move. Consider donating canned goods and other non-perishables to a local food pantry and pack up the remaining pantry items the last day before your move.

Office Supplies

Set aside everything you might need for personal, business, or school work between now and your move. Pack up any office supplies you have left. Important documents can be packed and taken with you.

Electronic devices and media players

When your move is just a few days away, pack these devices and be sure to document how everything is plugged in … what attached to where … take a photo with your camera or attach labels to the cords to give instructions when you are setting up the office at your new home. You also want to wrap everything securely for a safe journey. See our blog on how to pack electronic devices.

Toiletries and cleaning supplies

Set aside those things you use on a daily basis. Check expiration dates and toss those that are old, almost empty, or any you haven’t used in months. Pack these items in plastic zip-bags to prevent leakage. Pack your hairdryer and curling iron with them. Since this is one of the last boxes you will be packing, it should be readily accessible when you arrive in your new home.

At this point your move is probably about a week or less away, so you will need to prioritize these items in order of importance. But first … you’ll need to pack a box of items you’ll need right away in your new home.

“Open me first!” Box for Stress-Free Packing for a Move

An “open me first” box includes all of the items you might need during your first day/night in your new home. Packed in a box or suitcase, these items may include:

A change of clothes
Extra towels
Medication
Favorite electronic devices
Important documents
Expensive jewelry
Toilet paper
Snacks
Hand soap
Paper towels and a cleaning spray for immediate use in your new home, if necessary

The essentials box includes what you decide you will need. A good idea is to pack it sooner rather than later, and be sure to label it and keep it open and easily accessible until you are going out the door for the last time. Take it with you in the car if you can, so that it is with you when you arrive at your new destination.

Packing in a logical order avoids the risk of packing everything at the last minute, which. only ensures that your things will be damaged or misplaced. Give yourself as much time as you need to complete the packing process to be ready when the moving van arrives!

If you have questions about packing for your upcoming move, call Ayer Moving and Storage at (800) 233-6683 or email one of their Relocation Specialists. Download our packing guide: Secrets from the Packing Professionals at Ayer Moving and Storage.

Five Reasons Why You Need a COW

Five Reasons Why You Need a COW

You can probably think of more, but here are five reasons why you need a COW – a storage Container on Wheels, that is. A COW provides a portable storage solution when you need to store or move belongings across town or across the country.

Five Reasons Why You Need a COW

1. COWs are Convenient

Five Reasons Why You Need a COW A Container on Wheels can be easily transported from one location to another. You can park one in your driveway or keep one in your backyard or in a commercial parking lot.

A COW can be delivered to your door and positioned where you need it. You can keep your COW for as long as you need it, with daily, weekly, or monthly rates available.

COWs can be unloaded and reloaded when you need to do so and can be hitched to a moving truck and hauled away. You can access the COW when you want without having to drive to a storage warehouse.

 

2. Short-Term Storage

A COW is a cost-efficient option for those who need extra storage for a fixed time   period. 

If you are selling your home, for example, you will want to “stage” it by removing clutter or excess furniture so that the home shows most favorably when the realtor brings in prospective buyers.

If you are beginning a remodeling project, a COW is ideal for storing furnishings while the project is on-going.

If you have a business or commercial enterprise, a COW can help store overflow inventory or excess materials during peak seasons.

Five Reasons Why You Need a COW

3. Peace of Mind

Your rented COW can be kept on your property and locked securely when you are not using it. COWs are durable and made of steel, secure from environmental or weather damage. They are safe against pests and animals, dirt and debris. They have polyurethane casters that won’t mark the driveway or property. In addition, storage units have translucent roofing to provide natural light for greater visibility.

4. Available Locally

All COWs are owned by local moving and storage companies. Ayer Moving and Storage has several COWs on the premises available for rental. As a COWs dealership, Ayer Moving is ready to assist in helping you design the perfect storage option.

5. Sized to Meet Your Needs

COWs come in 16-foot long units. They are 80-inches wide and 8 feet tall including the casters. They fit inside a standard parking space and can be placed on several different surfaces. This size is the ideal solution for many temporary storage situations. There are more reasons why you need a COW, but these are a good place to start!

If you have questions about renting a COW or any other storage solutions, call Ayer Moving and Storage at (800) 233-6683 or email one of their Relocation Specialists.

Ayer Moving and Storage Joins AMSA ProMovers

Ayer Moving and Storage Joins AMSA ProMovers

Ayer Moving and Storage is proud to announce that they have been designated a part of the AMSA ProMovers by the American Moving and Storage Association (AMSA). In December 2020, AMSA was absorbed by the American Trucking Association.

AMSA ProMovers is a certification program that assists consumers in locating reputable, professional movers, who have agreed to abide by high standards. ProMovers provide information and assistance with everything from finding a mover, getting an estimate, and helping consumers with packing tips and understanding the valuation and insurance practices.

Ayer Moving and Storage Joins AMSA ProMovers

AMSA ProMovers: Only those with high standards

The AMSA’s Code of Ethics stipulates that members “stand united in our sincere beliefs that honest, ethical, efficient, and quality services to the public are the ultimate goals of this organization.”

It is their goal to consistently offer and provide the most efficient and reliable moving and storage services available, while adhering strictly to a policy of truth, honesty, integrity, and fairness in all business transactions.

“The ProMover program promotes ethical principles and practices in the moving and storage industry and works to mitigate unethical practices by awarding the certification to those companies who have proven themselves, while at the same time separating professional movers from rogue operators masquerading as legitimate movers.” – Moving.org

AMSA ProMovers must pass a rigorous review of professional business standards in order to quality as a ProMover.

Most importantly, this program offers consumers an identifiable means of separating reputable, professional movers from the rest. When you see the ProMover logo, you know that your moving company has been highly vetted.

Karen Strickland, president of Ayer Moving and Storage, said, “The ProMover seal represents nationally recognized, industry-wide standards of conduct for professional movers. We are proud to display the ProMover seal and to abide by their ethical and professional standards, and understand that the ProMover Certification Program is restricted to only those companies who exhibit the highest standards of performance, regulatory compliance, and customer service. We are honored to be among the best.”

If you need assistance with an upcoming move or have questions about what to do before, during, or after a move, call Ayer Moving and Storage at (800) 233-6683 or email our Relocation Specialists.

 

Packing Picture Frames and Mirrors for Your Move

Packing Picture Frames and Mirrors for Your Move

Having the proper materials is key for keeping your pictures and mirrors safe during a move. Before you start packing picture frames and mirrors, determine which of the following supplies you will need: 

  • Packing paper (unprinted newsprint paper)
  • Packing tape 
  • A permanent marker 
  • Bubble wrap  
  • Picture/mirror boxes  
  • Small moving boxes 
  • Cardboard tubes 
  • Artist’s or painter’s tape 
  • Flat foam or cardboard sheets 
  • Glassine, acid-free, or archival paper 
  • Photo boxes or albums 

Packing Picture Frames and Mirrors: Some Guidelines                           

  1.   Using the artist’s or painter’s tape, create an “X” across the glass. This will help keep the glass intact during transit. 
  2.   Cut a piece of cardboard or foam board slightly larger than the frame, place it in front of and behind the glass and secure it with packing tape. 
  3.   Wrap the entire piece in two or more sheets of packing paper and tape loose ends. 
  4.   Add a layer of bubble wrap for additional padding and security. Secure with packing tape. 
  5.   Cushion the bottom of a picture/mirror box with packing paper, and then slide the object into the box. Keep in mind, large items should be boxed individually in specialty boxes. Smaller mirrors and framed pictures can be wrapped and boxed together. Stack these items vertically and do not lay them flat. 
  6.   Fill extra space with more paper to prevent shifting. 
  7.   Tape and label the box “fragile” on all sides. 

Specialty picture/mirror boxes are available from your mover. 

Packing and moving canvases

The best way to pack a canvas will depend on if it’s stretched across a wooden frame or rolled.

For stretched canvases:  

  1.   Cover the canvas with glassine, acid-free or archival paper. 
  2.   Tape a sheet of foam or cardboard to the back of the canvas. 
  3.   Put the canvas into a plastic gallery wrap bag (available at art supply stores) to protect it from moisture. 
  4.   Wrap the entire canvas with two layers of bubble wrap and secure it with tape.
  5.   Sandwich the canvas between two sheets of foam boards or cardboard and use the packing tape to bind the pieces together. 
  6.   Line a picture/mirror box with padded paper and slide the canvas into the box, filling empty spaces with more paper.
  7.   Tape and label the box.  

For rolled canvases:

  1.   Lay the canvas between two sheets of glassine, acid-free or archival paper (painted side down). 
  2.   Loosely roll the canvas and paper (rolling too tight can cause damage).
  3.   Roll with Bubble Wrap.
  4.   Slide the canvas into a cardboard tube. 
  5.   Place the end caps on and seal them with packing tape. 
  6.   Label the tube.

More Helpful Tips for Packing Picture Frames and Mirrors

Keep these tips in mind when packing mirrors, wall art, and picture frames:

  • Don’t exceed 40 lbs. per box.  
  • Only use unprinted newsprint paper because the ink could cause damage. 
  • Don’t use packing peanuts for padding. They create static and can be difficult to remove from glass. 
  • Wash your hands or wear cotton gloves before handling any photos or canvases. The oil from your hands can create smudges and damage the quality of the items. 
  • Load boxed frames on their side. Never lay them flat because the pressure can crack the glass. 

If you have questions about packing mirrors and pictures or what happens before, during, or after a move, call the Relocation Specialists at Ayer Moving and Storage at (800) 233-6683 or email.

Tips for Moving a Washer and Dryer

Tips for Moving a Washer and Dryer

When planning on moving your washer and dryer, the first consideration needs to be: “to move or replace.”  Washers and dryers are a big investment and when planning a move, a decision must be made whether to move these appliances to your new home or to leave them with the home and buy new.  Here are some things to think about:

  1. How old are your washer and dryer? If they are 15 years old, better to leave them and purchase new models.
  2. Will they fit in your new home, especially if you are downsizing to a smaller home or condo?
  3. Research new appliances before deciding. New washers and dryers offer many features and energy-saving options.

Prepare for moving your washer and dryer

Washers and dryers need to be properly protected from damage during a move or while in storage. You should consult your owner’s manual for manufacturer’s instructions on moving a washer or dryer. 

Before the movers arrive 

  1. Clean the appliances by running a clean rinse in the washer to remove any detergent residue. You can add a vinegar solution through the rinse cycle if there is hard-to-remove residue. Remove lint from the dryer lint filter and clean according to manufacturer’s directions.
  2. Shut off the cold and hot water valves from the wall and disconnect the washer hose. For a gas dryer, turn off the gas and remove the hose very carefully from the wall. Consult your gas company for assistance.
  3. Switch off the washer and dryer’s circuit breakers.
  4. Leave the washer door open for a few days to ensure that it is completely dry before moving or storing it.
  5. Store hoses and electrical wires inside the washer and dryer for safe keeping during the move.  

Dolly.com provides a few extra tips and tricks to help you.

Be sure to use a dolly for moving your washer and dryer

The washer and dryer should be placed on a moving dolly and secured with bungee cords or rope.  The washer and dryer should be moved in an upright position – do not lay them on their sides under any circumstances!  A stackable washer/dryer should be moved and stored in an upright position as well.

Laying a washer and dryer on their sides can cause the inner and outer tubs to bump against each other, which can loosen support pads or damage the suspension. This can also cause the tubs to move out of alignment and cause problems in operation. 

Wrap ‘er up!

To prevent scratches, broken doors or hinges while moving your washer and dryer, wrap blankets around the appliances. Blankets can be secured by tape, bungie cords, or rope.

Last, but not least

Load the washer and dryer into the moving truck last. These appliances will then be the first items removed when you are unloading at your new home.

 

If you have questions about moving or storing your washer and dryer, call one of our Ayer Moving and Storage relocation specialists at 800-23-6683.

Should you use your Attic for Storage? The Answer is No, and Here's Why...

Should you use your Attic for Storage? The Answer is No, and Here’s Why…

Should you use your attic for storage? The Answer is No, and Here’s Why You May Want to Think Twice.

Our home collects our memories, our travels and sometimes a lot of our belongings. After some time, the spaces begin to fill up and we look for storage in every room and every corner. We see places such as our basements and attics as perfect storage rooms for our clothes and holiday decorations. Although putting boxes away is great for keeping your home clean and organized, storing them in your attic is more dangerous then you may think.

Here is what a roofer would say when asked if one should store items in their attic.

The answer: No. Do not ever store items in your attic space. The reason is linked with your home’s insulation and ventilation.

First let me explain what role your attic plays in your roof’s life expectancy. The attic is the heart and lifeline of your roof. A well ventilated and insulated attic will assist the roof in providing protection from the crazy New England weather. Attic ventilation works on the principle that heated air naturally rises, primarily utilizing two types of vents:

Intake vents, located at the lowest part of the roof under the eaves, allow cool air to enter the attic. Hot air exhaust vents, located at the peak of the roof, allow hot air to escape.

Taking advantage of this natural process, referred to as passive ventilation, is the most common way to vent an attic. In order to facilitate this exchange of warm and cool air, the general rule of thumb suggests installing at least 1 sq.ft. of vent for every 300 sq.ft. of attic floor. Building codes vary, though, so check with your local building authority for the specifics that pertain to your community.

The way the attic is kept cool by its air intake in the eves of the attic and its air outtake in the ridge and peak of the attic room reduces the danger of iced dams, and unwanted leaks that can lead to rot and decay of your home’s wood and plywood.

Where do homeowners go wrong?

Many fall short when they decide to use their attic as a storage room. Using your attic as storage disrupts the process of attic ventilation and causes potential ice dams.

When we get a call for a leak in the winter months due to an ice dam, the first place we inspect is the interior of the attic. When we arrive in the attic and find that it is covered in boxes we know exactly what caused the leak and the ice dam in the first place.

The boxes of clothes in the attic have disturbed the air flow and have contributed to the cause of the ice dams. The boxes of holiday ornaments have been pressed up against the insulation which has also caused the insulation to lose its R value. (An insulating material’s resistance to conductive heat flow is measured or rated in terms of its thermal resistance or R-value — the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating effectiveness. The R-value depends on the type of insulation, its thickness, and its density.)

The boxes in the attic have added to the condensation, moisture and potential mold to the attic walls.
The boxes in the attic have allowed the hot and cold air to reach your roofing shingles. When asphalt shingles are met with hot and cold air it causes the shingle to prematurely age and lose a lot of their asphalt granulares.

These four reasons should make you question if it is even worth considering the attic as a storage room. Is it worth dealing with an ice dam or the risk of mold in the attic? Is it worth it to potentially premature age your roof because ventilation has been compromised?

The answer: No. Always no. It is not worth it. It is much wiser to have your belongings in designated closets or a storage facility then to cause issues for you and your home. There are several options for off-site storage, including in a temperature-controlled storage warehouse, a self-storage unit, or in a Container on Wheels ® (COW) for temporary storage.

As a roofer, we recommend that you always store in your home’s closets, or in a storage facility. Keep your attic floor clean and free of clutter.

Let the attic be an attic. This advice may save you thousands of dollars and a lot of unwanted leaks.and headaches.

10 Ways to Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic

10 Ways to Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic

Support Local Businesses During a Pandemic.

Small businesses have had to endure a lot since the beginning of the pandemic known as Covid-19.  Retail stores, restaurants, hair and nail salons, and recreational venues were closed and now that they are allowed to open, have to limit the number of patrons to conform to social distancing rules. Some businesses can’t hire staff because some people are afraid they will get sick if they go back to work.

When we support local business, we are supporting the local economy. Now is the time to help small businesses who need our patronage now more than ever. Here are some ways to do just that.

Support Local Businesses by Shopping Local

Look first to your local retailers – hardware stores, pharmacies, groceries, shoe stores, clothing boutiques, liquor stores. Don a mask and visit the stores for what you need. Check to see if they offer online selling with pickup or delivery service.

You can find local businesses to support by visiting your local Chambers of Commerce.

Some local chambers in our Area include:

North Central MA Chamber of Commerce

Nashoba Valley Chamber of Commerce

Marlborough Regional Chamber of Commerce

Worcester Area Chamber of Commerce

Support Local Businesses by Shopping locally online

Whether it is a retail store, supermarket, or restaurant, you can order online and then arrange for pick up or delivery.

To shop small local eEommerce stores visit over 2592 all over America on PRIVY.com

Support Local Businesses by Purchasing Gift Cards

Buy now and plan to use your gift cards later or for an online purchase. Your purchase helps keep cash flowing and doors open.

Buy Local Gift Cards from the North Central MA Region Today!

Support Local Businesses by Being a Generous Tipper

Wait staff depend on tips as their hourly rate is lower than you think. When there are fewer customers, the daily or weekly take-home takes a hit. Be generous and apply a larger than normal percentage to your tab for a tip.

Become a Discount Shopper Locally

If you haven’t yet discovered the joy of getting a bargain, be on the lookout for small businesses that are offering steep discounts to boost revenue. Purchase larger than normal quantities of sale items and you’ll be helping to keep a small business in business.

Order Local Restaurant Fare for Take Out

Preparing three meals a day at home can be a daunting task. Take a break and order take out for curb service or home delivery. Many restaurants are offering a limited menu at discounted pricing. You can order direct or through a food delivery service like UberEats.com or DoorDash.com. If the weather is nice and your favorite restaurant has outside table service, consider going out to eat.

Support Local Businesses and your Experiences on Social Media

Give your favorite stores and restaurants a “high five” by posting a review on social media. Whether you like standard review sites like yelp.com or reviews on the business Facebook page or if you enjoy snapping a photo of your food or purchase, the business will appreciate and benefit from the free exposure.

Keep Up Your Local Memberships if You Can

Even if you can’t attend the gym or class that was cancelled or live performance that didn’t happen, consider donating the cost to the business. If you had season tickets and half the season was cancelled, donate the unused portion rather than request a refund. These small donations will go a long way to ensuring a business or not-for-profit will be there next season when things are hopefully back to normal.

Many local businesses play it very “close to the vest” and will not be able to withstand several months with no or little revenue. Selecting one or more of the tips above, will not only be appreciated and remembered, it might be the difference between an OPEN or CLOSED sign in the months to come.

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19. These are challenging times and if you need a solution for storing household belongings now during COVID-19, you want to be sure that precautions are being taken for your safety when dealing with your storage facility.

Storage Options with Safety First in Mind

This global Pandemic has spawned creative and practical ways to deal with and expand upon the CDC guidelines for safety. At Ayer Moving and Storage your health and safety and the safety of our employees are our highest priority. We screen our moving crew for symptoms. We have hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes on board all our trucks. We have increased our daily cleaning procedures for shared, high-touch surfaces on our trucks, equipment, in our storage, dispatch, and office areas. No-contact arrangements are made by phone so there is no need to go into the office. We also complete a short COVID-19 questionnaire prior to every job.

Everyone involved is required to wear a mask whether in the warehouse or storage unit and it is now the norm to maintain social distancing of six feet or more. In addition, we only use “clean” pens and are liberal in the use of disinfectant spray and/or wipes.

Reasons Why You May Need a Storage Options as a Solution


You may not have extra space at home to store household items you want and need, but don’t use very often, including seasonal clothing, outgrown toys, electronics, furniture, or valuable artwork.

You’ll need extra storage when your college student is home and dorm furnishings and décor need a place temporarily. The same is true for Military service members who require short- or long-term storage.

Business or household paperwork or tax records that you are required by law to keep for years can be safely stored in a storage unit.

Do you have a sports car or antique vehicle that you want to safely store over the winter months? Or perhaps you have an RV that you need to move out of your driveway or backyard.

Out of season recreational vehicles – a boat, ATV, jet-ski, or motorcycle can be put away in a storage facility.

If you are selling your home and need to remove furnishings to stage it properly or if you have sold your home, but are not yet ready to move to your new house, a storage facility is the ideal solution.

Types of Storage Options Available

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19 Warehouse StorageA temperature-controlled warehouse is perfect for long- or short-term storage. Your belongings can be picked up at your home and loaded onto a truck that will deliver them to the warehouse. There everything is packed into crates or loaded onto shelves. Ayer Moving and Storage offers 20,000 sq. ft. of warehouse where you can store a little or a lot.

 

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19 Self-Storage UnitsThese handy units come in various sizes and are available for monthly rentals. You bring your belongings to the unit store them inside yourself. You can bring in additional items and/or remove some when you need them. You supply your own lock so you, alone, have a key to your unit and can access it according to the facility’s schedule and hours of operation. You can cover your belongings with thick sheets of plastic, or bubble wrap and use plywood or boards to place between layers of stacked items.

 

 

Storage Options for You Even During COVID-19 Containers on Wheels – Ayer Moving and Storage offers COWs (Containers on Wheels) for temporary or long-term storage on your property or ours. COWs are lockable and weatherproof, steel-constructed containers that we deliver to your driveway. Ideal for use in-between moves or if you are doing renovation and need a place for furnishings until the job is complete. Available in 8’ or 16’ containers and can be rented daily, weekly, or monthly.

If you are planning a local do-it-yourself move, you can pack up your COW and when you are ready to move, we’ll load it onto our truck and deliver it to your new home.

For more information about storage options at Ayer Moving and Storage, call 800-233-MOVE or email. (info@ayermoving.com)