Organizing your Move: A Responsibility Checklist

Organizing your Move: A Responsibility Checklist

Organizing your move is a mass of details to be organized into a smooth transition. No one needs to be reminded that moving can be stressful and that many things can go awry.

It can be helpful to know what to expect from your mover… and to know what is expected of you, the homeowner when organizing a move. The process is not one-sided; both the mover and the homeowner must be aware of their responsibilities and deadlines so that the move can be smooth and safe. 

Here is what you can expect from a professional and credentialed moving company. 

Getting Started on Organizing your Move

The movers will:

  • provide you with a copy of Your Rights and Responsibilities, a brochure published by the US Department of Transportation, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.
  • Make a home visit to complete a comprehensive survey to provide you with a written estimate. (During Covid-19, virtual in-home surveys are being conducted to keep mover and homeowners safe.)
  • Send homeowners a written estimate by email within 3 days.
  • Follow up with homeowners by phone to determine if there are questions.
  • Work with homeowner to establish a schedule for packing, if appropriate, and moving.
  • Submit a written contract if homeowner decides to proceed.
  • Explain any terminology unfamiliar to the homeowner, such as “long carry” charges
  • Explain the options for insurance: what is and what is not covered.

Packing for Moving Day

The movers will:

  • Explain that homeowners are charged for the labor to pack and/or unpack belongings, as well as for the containers and packing material.
  • Set a date for packing, usually one to two days prior to the moving date.
  • Take care to pack carefully using appropriate and special boxes and packing material.
  • Pack and label under the homeowner’s direction.
  • Provide you with a packing order and carton count.
  • If the homeowner is packing, the mover can provide a helpful packing guide.

 Liability for Loss/Damage During your Move

Moving companies are required to assume some basic liability by carrying legal liability valuation and insurance coverage. They also:

  • Provide motor vehicle coverage for bodily injury and property damage.
  • Carry insurance if household goods are damaged due to negligence.
  • Must disclose in writing, the limitation of liability for the value of goods at a rate of not less than 60 cents per pound, per article.
  • Explain options for additional insurance coverage. 

Moving Day

  • Crew meets at the mover’s location to pick up van, collect supplies, and get last minute instructions.
  • Arrive at homeowner’s residence at the time specified, given leeway for traffic and/or weather conditions.
  • Telephone or text homeowner to advise of any unforeseen delays.
  • Protect homeowner’s floors by using floor cloths.
  • Protect homeowner’s furniture with moving blankets.
  • Load van/truck using best practices for safety and efficiency.
  • Take appropriate short breaks, when needed, for hydration and lunch.
  • Sticker all items with dedicated contract number.
  • For interstate moves, inventory all items loaded onto truck and provide homeowner with a copy.
  • Always show courtesy and professional work habits.

That’s quite a list; however, there are some things that Homeowners should be aware fall under their responsibility and to-do list.

What Do you Need for Organizing Your Move?

  • Consider in advance of the Mover’s visit (virtual or in-person) of what items you plan to take to your new home. Are appliances staying or going? What about the piano?
  • Notify the mover if you change your mind and decide the dining room suite will be moved, as this will make a difference in your estimate. If you want to take your piano after all, the movers will need to plan for a special cart or straps to move it safely.
  • Provide mover with a clear and accurate address of your current residence and the location of your destination. Include information about heavy items, the number of floors in your current and new homes. Also advise if there are unusually narrow hallways, winding stairways, or long distances between the home and the van. 
  • Review your estimate and write down any questions you may have for the mover. When comparing estimates, be sure you are comparing “apples to apples.” Ask if you are unsure.
  • Schedule realistically. Especially if you are planning on packing everything yourself. Do not rush this part of the process.
  • Make decisions on what needs to be packed and how it is to be labeled before the packers arrive if the movers are packing for you. You are billed on labor time, so you want to have things organized ahead of time.
  • If there are any changes in schedule, packing, or what is to be moved, the homeowner is required to notify the mover ASAP so these changes can be accommodated.

Liability for Loss/Damage

  • The homeowner should understand the options for insurance coverage through the mover and through their homeowners’ insurance.
  • Ask questions. The homeowner’s antique rug will be valued at 60 cents per pound under the basic liability insurance plan, unless the homeowner it is insured separately.

Organizing your Move for the Big Day

  • Have all items that are to be packed, boxed and labeled, and ready to be loaded on the truck.
  • If you are moving during the winter, ensure that walkways and driveways are shoveled so that there is a clear path to the home and to the truck to be loaded.
  • Be available to direct movers and to answer any questions they may have.
  • Make arrangements for pets and young children with caretakers so they are kept safe during the loading.
  • Understand that the heat or inclement weather may slow the process or that the crew will need to take additional breaks to hydrate.

When movers and homeowners understand their respective responsibilities, they work in tandem with the result being a smooth and less-stressful experience for everyone.

If you have questions about a move you are planning, call the relocation experts at Ayer Moving and Storage at (800) 233-6683.

Moving Your Electronic Devices - Do it Right; Do it Safely!

Moving Your Electronic Devices – Do it Right; Do it Safely!

When it comes to moving various electronic devices – computers, tablets, stereos, televisions, digital recorders, and game systems – individuals often pack these high-cost items more casually than they would an antique or valued piece of art. Even though most electronic devices have sturdy plastic cases, they require special care when being packed for a move. If your move requires a temporary stay in storage, fluctuating temperatures, humidity, and dust can damage sensitive components.

Here’s how to do it right and do it safely!

Preparing for the Move

  • Gather your user manuals or download them from the manufacturer’s website. Manufacturers may have special instructions for packing and moving their devices.
  • Backup all data and files.
  • Remove batteries in remotes or accessories.
  • Eject CDs, DVDs, Blu-rays, and game cartridges and tape the drives shut.
  • Remove toner cartridges from laser printers and place them in a plastic bag – tape the bag to the printer.
  • Detach wires and accessories, place in a plastic bag and label the bag.
  • Place color stickers on each cord and the same color sticker where the cord connects to the device … or use a write on label to indicate what goes where.
  • For extra help in reassembling, for reference take photos of the cables before you unplug everything.
  • Using a vacuum cleaner extension, vacuum the inside of your desktop computer to remove dust.
  • Charge all your rechargeable batteries before moving day.
  • Write the passwords for your electronic devices on a card you can keep in your wallet to avoid frustration when setting up your computers on arrival in your new home.
  • Talk with your mover about insurance for your electronics (and other valuable items) to cover them during loading, moving, and unloading.

Packing for the Move

  • Use original cartons if you saved them when you purchased the equipment.
  • Ask your mover for computer and flat-screen TV cartons or an appropriately sized sturdy box in which to place your electronics. 
  • To minimize damage caused by dust, wrap electronics in linen or clean (unprinted) newsprint. Then use bubble wrap. Anti-static bubble wrap is safe for electronics and can be used generously to act as a shock absorber. However, don’t use newsprint to pack screens. Paper can easily scratch delicate screens. Use fabric and then bubble wrap for extra security.
  • You’ll want at least two inches of padding on all sides of the electronic device. 
  • If you don’t have a special flat-screen TV box, use padded moving blankets to wrap the TV. Never store or move a TV flat; stand it upright against a wall for support.
  • Make a list of all devices in the box with their companion accessories, and cables/cords and store the list in the box.
  • Add packets of silica gel to the box which will absorb excess moisture before it can collect on metal surfaces and cause corrosion. This is especially important for long-distance moves or if your boxes will be in storage.
  • Number, rather than label the box with a description, to reduce the chance of attracting unwanted attention from would-be thieves. If storing, place these boxes out of view toward to back of the storage unit.

When in Storage

Electronic devices are highly sensitive to temperature extremes. Cold causes metal parts to contract, weakening soldered components. LCDs can even freeze during a harsh cold snap. Heat can damage in two ways – as metal parts expand in hot weather, they place stress on soldered connections. Warm air holds more moisture and high humidity is very destructive to electronics. 

Esure that electronics in storage are properly packed and insulated with blankets.

This guideline is detailed by design. The more you plan and follow these steps, the safer and more secure your electronics will be. You’ll be all set to reassemble your electronics and start enjoying these devices that have become such an important part of all our lives.  

If you have any questions about how to pack your electronic devices or need special boxes or packing material, call one of our Ayer Moving and Storage relocation specialists at 800-23-6683.

Tips for Moving a Washer and Dryer

Tips for Moving a Washer and Dryer

When planning on moving your washer and dryer, the first consideration needs to be: “to move or replace.”  Washers and dryers are a big investment and when planning a move, a decision must be made whether to move these appliances to your new home or to leave them with the home and buy new.  Here are some things to think about:

  1. How old are your washer and dryer? If they are 15 years old, better to leave them and purchase new models.
  2. Will they fit in your new home, especially if you are downsizing to a smaller home or condo?
  3. Research new appliances before deciding. New washers and dryers offer many features and energy-saving options.

Prepare for moving your washer and dryer

Washers and dryers need to be properly protected from damage during a move or while in storage. You should consult your owner’s manual for manufacturer’s instructions on moving a washer or dryer. 

Before the movers arrive 

  1. Clean the appliances by running a clean rinse in the washer to remove any detergent residue. You can add a vinegar solution through the rinse cycle if there is hard-to-remove residue. Remove lint from the dryer lint filter and clean according to manufacturer’s directions.
  2. Shut off the cold and hot water valves from the wall and disconnect the washer hose. For a gas dryer, turn off the gas and remove the hose very carefully from the wall. Consult your gas company for assistance.
  3. Switch off the washer and dryer’s circuit breakers.
  4. Leave the washer door open for a few days to ensure that it is completely dry before moving or storing it.
  5. Store hoses and electrical wires inside the washer and dryer for safe keeping during the move.  

Dolly.com provides a few extra tips and tricks to help you.

Be sure to use a dolly for moving your washer and dryer

The washer and dryer should be placed on a moving dolly and secured with bungee cords or rope.  The washer and dryer should be moved in an upright position – do not lay them on their sides under any circumstances!  A stackable washer/dryer should be moved and stored in an upright position as well.

Laying a washer and dryer on their sides can cause the inner and outer tubs to bump against each other, which can loosen support pads or damage the suspension. This can also cause the tubs to move out of alignment and cause problems in operation. 

Wrap ‘er up!

To prevent scratches, broken doors or hinges while moving your washer and dryer, wrap blankets around the appliances. Blankets can be secured by tape, bungie cords, or rope.

Last, but not least

Load the washer and dryer into the moving truck last. These appliances will then be the first items removed when you are unloading at your new home.

 

If you have questions about moving or storing your washer and dryer, call one of our Ayer Moving and Storage relocation specialists at 800-23-6683.