How to Plan and Organize an Office Move

Moving your home is a massive feat of coordination, hard work, and patience. Moving a whole office is an even bigger endeavor, that requires moving larger items, and coordinating with a much larger group of people.

It may be challenging, but it doesn’t have to be difficult. Early in your planning, start following these simple steps to get your office move under control, and make the process as simple as possible for everyone you work with.

Give Yourself Enough Time

Moving an office doesn’t just involve communication and coordination — it involves minimizing the downtime you’ll experience during the actual move, so you can get back to business ASAP.

Experts estimate that for a smaller office, you should schedule your move to an absolute minimum of three months in advance. Mid-size to large offices will need anywhere between six to eight months from start to finish. Keep this in mind when planning move-in dates and signing leases — both for your new office space and your current.

What’s Your Budget?

You’ll need to buy boxes, padding, tape, and other supplies. You may need to rent dollies and a moving truck, and you will need to hire movers.

Before you begin making serious plans, check to see what the budget is for moving your office. You need to be able to afford all the necessary tools to get the job done swiftly, safely, and securely.

Know What You’re Getting Into

It’s not enough just to tour the new office. Planning an office layout is precision work, and you need as much information as possible.

As soon as you can, get blueprints of the new space. This will include information about doors, windows, bathrooms, and electrical outlets — all of which is key to figuring out how to lay-out your new space.

Measure your existing furniture, and determine what could go where. Keep in mind existing problems in your current space, and how you could resolve them in the new office.

If you plan to call in carpenters or other professionals to make adjustments to the new office, make these arrangements early on, and keep in mind that these projects often take longer than even seasoned professionals estimate. You’ll want everything in its proper order when your team moves in.

Delegate!

You can’t do it alone. Especially if you’re moving a large office, make sure you’re working with your employees or fellow coworkers to coordinate the move.

For instance, if your office has several divisions, make sure each division is responsible for packing its own items. If you have a smaller office, you may need to delegate directly or take volunteers for people who will coordinate the smaller and more local aspects of moving the office.

Check In Regularly

Schedule regular meetings with your staff to check in on the state of the move. Set clear goals and deadlines for packing and other essential steps, and make sure these are met. If a department is lagging behind on the move, figure out what they need to succeed — just like you would do when handling any other big office project.

Hire Movers

Moving an office may be essential to your continued operations, but your office employees can’t actually do the move for you.

Hiring professional movers like Ayer Moving pays for itself. We’ll get the job done quickly and safely. We know how to pack you up, how to keep delicate equipment safe, move heavy furniture safely, and make sure nothing gets lost. The money you spend on hiring movers will reap ample dividends, when you factor in the time and stress you’ll save.

The prospect of packing up and moving your entire office may seem like a nightmare. But by planning far in advance, understanding your timeline, creating a budget, delegating tasks and checking in on their completion, and hiring professional movers to help, you’ll be a step ahead of the game.

9 Moving and Packing Tips to Make Your Move Simple

It’s no secret: moving can be a huge headache. For many people, every step on the way is stressful — from finding a new place to live to packing and moving boxes. All that’s on top of the ordinary life stress you experience just by uprooting yourself and your family.

But moving doesn’t have to be so stressful. Follow these tips throughout your move to ensure your move is as quick, easy, and painless as possible.

1) Create a to-do list.

Even if you’re just moving across town, there’s a lot to keep track of. As you go along, you’ll find more and more tasks to complete. It’s easy to start dropping balls, and you’ll start to feel very frazzled.

Early on in your process, create a to-do list. Add to it as you find or remember new tasks, and cross things off as you finish. For time-sensitive tasks, consider putting together a calendar, so you can visualize upcoming deadlines easily. Having all this information on paper, outside of your head, will help you avoid a lot of stress down the road.

2) Downsize your stuff.

If you’re like many people, moving is a process of discovering how many things you own. You’ll discover clothes you haven’t worn in years, crafts projects you picked up and then discarded, appliances that no longer work, books you’ve never read and never plan to.

Many people find this review to be one of the most stressful parts of moving. Don’t be afraid to purge items you’re not using, and won’t use. Otherwise, you’re simply paying to bring useless items with you.

3) Donate what you don’t need.

Many charities, like Goodwill, the Salvation Army, and St. Vincent de Paul, are eager to get their hands on what you’re getting rid of. Make sure it’s in working order before you give it away — otherwise, you’re just offloading the cost of dumping items onto a charity. And don’t forget that most of these charities will work with you to pick up your items, especially large ones.

4) Sell some things, but…

If you don’t want to donate all your unwanted items, you might try holding a garage sale or unloading some of them on eBay or a comparable service. Be aware, though, that selling your used items may take more time than donating them, and it may take up extra time when you’re already stressed. Unless you know the money you’ll get is worth the time you’ll spend, it may be better to donate what you can.

5) Sort what’s left.

When you’re assembling boxes, it’s easy to simply pack all things in one room together. This can be handy but can also cause problems. You may catch yourself packing books in with knickknacks (because they’re both in your living room), or plates in with appliances (since they’re both in your kitchen).

Instead, sort like with like. Pack all your clothes together, your books together, and so forth. This may seem counter-intuitive at the time, but it’ll make organizing your new space far easier.

6) Start packing as early as possible.

You may feel silly having boxes around months before you move out, but you’ll save yourself some serious trouble if you pack close to your date. As early as you can, begin packing items you know you won’t need until you’ve moved into your new place. Label your boxes carefully, and store them somewhere safe until it’s time to load the truck.

7) Call in some favors.

Maybe you’ve helped friends move in the past. Maybe you have a friend who’s always happy to help you pack. (Or maybe you know you can bribe someone with pizza if they’ll move a few boxes.) Now’s the time to call in these favors.

It’s best to do this as early as possible. Let people know when you’ll need them, and what specific services they can provide you with. This way, they won’t feel like you’re springing anything unexpected on them or guilt-tripping them into providing help.

8) Schedule disconnect dates.

You’ll need to disconnect your electricity and possibly your water, internet, landline, and cable service. If you wait until you’re about to move to do so, you may see your prospective disconnect dates fly past you.

The good news is you can usually schedule your disconnect dates well in advance. Just call your provider’s customer service line and ask. You’ll usually want to schedule the disconnection for your move-out day, so you can still vacuum, mop, and do other cleanup that will require your items.

9) Hire professional movers.

Many people think of hiring a moving company as surrender. But when you’re moving, your focus should be on logistics and adjusting to your new life — not the manual labor of moving heavy boxes.

Movers move people all the time (obviously) and know things about moving heavy objects, stacking objects safely, and keeping your items safe that you yourself may not know. By hiring professional movers, planning ahead, packing early, and following the other tips on this list, you’ll assure the smoothest move possible.

It’s no secret: moving can be a huge headache. For many people, every step on the way is stressful — from finding a new place to live to packing and moving boxes. All that’s on top of the ordinary life stress you experience just by uprooting yourself and your family.

But moving doesn’t have to be so stressful. Follow these tips throughout your move to ensure your move is as quick, easy, and painless as possible.

Let us help!

Give us a call at 1 (800) 233-6683  or visit our website to discuss hiring expert movers. Also, consider downloading our packing guide.

10 Tips to Make Moving Easier on You and Your Kids

Moving to a new house is extremely stressful for the entire family. Even though kids don’t sign leases or mortgages or do most of the packing (lucky them!), they can still feel uprooted and overwhelmed about moving to a new place.

Follow these simple steps, and you’ll be able to ease the stress of moving for you and your kids.

1. Tell your kids ASAP

It’s always best to tell your kids as soon as possible that they’ll be moving, so everyone can emotionally prepare for the experience.

If you’re having trouble explaining the move, describe it like a fun journey or adventure — because that’s kind of what it is! Tell them about how you’ve accepted a new job, or facts about your new town. Help them remember that you’re eager to start this new journey together.

2. Get them involved

People — including kids — feel better when they’re involved in the planning process. It gives them the feeling that they have some kind of input into what’s happening, which reduces anxiety.

You may want to handle most of the packing and cleaning yourself — and to be honest, you’ll probably do a better job than your kids. But try to find small, simple ways your kids can help out, whether by sweeping after you’ve moved furniture, or packing a box of toys. You’ll appreciate the help, and they’ll appreciate being part of the process.

3. Take care of yourself

Moving is stressful. You’ll probably be anxious through most of your move. That level of stress will have a bad effect on your mood — and when you’re upset, everyone can feel the stress.

During the move, make sure you’re taking care of yourself. Try to get enough sleep, stay hydrated, and eat healthy food. This will make it far easier to take care of your kids in a spirit of patience and compassion, no matter how hectic your move becomes.

4. Let them know what to expect

We fear what we don’t know or don’t understand. When you’re touring homes and weighing your options, it’s easy to forget how your kids weren’t along with you on that journey. Wouldn’t you be scared to move into a place you’d never seen before?

Set aside a few minutes to take pictures of your new home. Share these with your kids, and tell them about the places they’re about to experience. This will make moving into this space for the first time fun, rather than scary.

5. Hold fast to routines

Kids thrive on daily routines. (So do adults!) But during a busy move, it’s easy to lose sight of these routines, which adds to stress and uncertainty.

Don’t lose your routines. If you go for a walk every day at a certain time, keep on doing that, no matter how busy or distracted you are. If you help them with homework, keep doing that. Don’t forget to have dinner on the table, as often as you can, on the same schedule you usually do. This will help kids feel like they’re still in the rhythms of everyday life — just in a new place.

6. Make time for goodbyes

Goodbyes are hard, so a lot of people avoid them. But they create a sense of closure that’s valuable to both kids and adults.

On the last day of school, make sure your kids say goodbye to their teachers and friends. Take them around the neighborhood on move-out day so they can see friends and neighbors. And although it may make you feel silly, plan a little extra time for them to walk through the house to say goodbye to each room.

7. Set up kids’ spaces

Not having a bedroom or workspace leaves you feeling uprooted. Kids are the same way. Do your best to set up a space for your kids — preferably a bedroom — as soon as you’ve moved in. It doesn’t have to be completely unpacked, but it’ll serve as a good home base — and it’ll keep them busy unpacking and organizing their new space.

8. Do something fun

Moving is both tedious and overwhelming. Why not do something to celebrate when you’re done? Explore the neighborhood, throw a party, or find a new restaurant to try. It doesn’t have to be anything elaborate. Your kids will appreciate the distraction, and you probably will too.

9. Stay in Touch

It’s easy to lose sight of friends and family after you’ve moved. Encourage your kids to take down friends’ and teachers’ contact information before moving. Remind them to write to their old friends to let them know how much they miss them, and to update them on everything new and exciting that’s happened since the move.

10. Make room for bad feelings

Nobody likes being told what to feel. Bad feelings of fear, anger, and sadness will come up naturally during a move.

These feelings can’t be controlled, but you can control how you react to them. Tantrums aren’t OK, but if your kids are expressing sorrow or fear, it’s important to hold space for them throughout their process. These feelings will pass, and there will be plenty of time to enjoy the good things to come.

Contact Us

All these tips will help you move as peacefully as possible. But if you’re looking to take an extra step toward an easy, happy move that’ll take the pressure off your family, go to Ayer Moving and Storage. Ayer Moving works hard to provide top-notch professional moving services to families in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Take the first step toward a painless move today by calling 1-800-233-MOVE.

7 Easy Ways to Make Your New House Feel Like Home

Moving into a new house can be stressful. You’ve likely spent a lot of time choosing the right neighborhood and the best house for you and your family. You also know the transition involves paperwork, phone calls, transfer of utilities and services, and a lot of patience. But after you move in, you’ll likely need time before you feel at home in the new environment.

The following seven ideas will help you settle in quickly and easily, making your new house feel just like home.

1. Spring Clean as You Pack for Your New House

Believe it or not, you shouldn’t bring everything you own to your new house. Treat packing like spring cleaning. Consider each item before you pack it so you don’t clutter your new home with unwanted or unusable items. Before you stow an item in a moving box, ask:

  • Is it something you need in your new home?
  • Does it work properly?
  • Is it something you use daily, weekly, by season or not at all?
  • Does it have sentimental value?

If the item isn’t a keeper, trash it, recycle it or find it a new home. For items that are in good working order or still usable, make a little extra moving cash by selling them at a yard sale. Or, choose a charity and donate the goods. In many cases, your donation could be tax deductible.

2. Pack by Sight and Sound

Getting used to a new house means getting used to new sights and sounds. From the buzz of the refrigerator to morning traffic outside the window, the first few weeks can be a cacophony of new experiences. Feeling at home in your new space is easier if you surround yourself with familiar sights and sounds. Try packing a “sights and sounds” box with things like a favorite clock, framed pictures or other treasured knick-knacks, so you bring what looks and sounds like home into your new house.

3. Prioritize Unpacking When You Move In

Packing by room is usually a given. But when you unpack, prioritize your rooms by which ones will help you ease into your new house. If the kitchen is your favorite room, unpack the kitchen first. If you have small children, pack special boxes they can unpack themselves in their new rooms. Another great idea is to pack a backpack or suitcase with your daily items, such as medicines, makeup, personal care items, chargers or journals, so you won’t have to go searching for what you need most the first day in your new home.

4. Get Back Into Your Routine at Your New House

The sooner you get back into your regular routine, the quicker you’ll feel at home in your new house. If you can unpack all your belongings quickly, you will soon get back into the swing of things. Even if you’re having to work your schedule around unpacking a little at a time, maintain as much of your regular routine as possible. Adjust to your new surroundings gradually, incorporating the old with the new.

5. Make Your New Home “Scent”-sational

Whether it’s the smell of a wonderful home-cooked meal or your favorite essential oils, making your new house smell like home helps you relax. Baking, cooking or turning on a diffuser not only brings recognizable scents but can also rid your house of other smells. New homes may have smells of construction work. Older homes may have lingering smells of previous tenants. You can safely remove those scents and feel more at home by introducing new smells. Try:

  • Baking cookies or a pie
  • Lighting a scented candle
  • Using a diffuser with citrus oils
  • Placing your favorite scented air fresheners around the house

6. Clean Your New House

Even if your new house was professionally cleaned before you moved in, you may still need to clean things up. Unpacking introduces dust and dirt. Breaking down moving boxes also drums up dust. If you have pets, they may have accidents before they get accustomed to their new environment. Break out the vacuum and a dust rag to tidy things up. Plus, that clean smell when you’re finished will help you feel right at home.

7. Decorate Your New Home to Make It Yours

Finally, add your own personal touches to your new house with old and new décor. Incorporate some pieces from previous homes, like photos and keepsakes, to bring in the familiar. But also try something new, like a throw blanket over the back of a chair or a new vase on the table, to brighten your rooms. You’ll add your own style and feel like you belong even quicker as you fill your space with special decorations.

Planning for the move into your new house makes the transition smoother. The less you have to worry about in your new house during and after the move, the more you’ll enjoy it and feel at home. Ayer Moving & Storage offers local moves within Massachusetts and interstate moves, as well as packing and storage services. Whether you’re moving across town or across the country, Ayer Moving can move you! Contact us today to schedule your move.

8 Things to Do on Your First Day in Your New Home

Congratulations on moving into your new home! Once all your things have arrived, there’s a good chance you’ll feel accomplished — but also exhausted, overwhelmed, and ready to head to bed ASAP.

But don’t do that just yet! There are several important steps you should take immediately after moving in. Even if you just want to relax and take a breather, by doing these things rather than putting them off, you’ll be setting yourself up for success in your new home.

1) Take a moment to appreciate your new home

You’ve just arrived at your home after what may have been a very long journey (both physically and emotionally). You have plenty of work cut out for you when it comes to unpacking and setting-up your living spaces. But before you start, take a moment to appreciate how far you’ve come.

Take a slow, deliberate walk through your home, and appreciate the potential of each room. Open the windows and look outside. Walk through your yard. Maybe take a photo of your family on the front stoop, or take a stroll through your new neighborhood and meet the neighbors.

Whatever you choose to do, entering your new home for the first time is an important moment of your life. You should take some time to really savor it.

2) Clean up

Some homes on the market are pristine. Others are… less so. Even if you feel your new home is fairly clean, going through and cleaning it yourself is a great way to familiarize yourself with your space and make it truly your own.

Ideally, you should clean your new home top to bottom before any boxes arrive. Try to beat the moving truck by a few hours, and arrive with brooms, mops, dusters, sponges, and cleaning products.

Then start cleaning. Remember: you’ll be able to do this once the boxes arrive, but it’ll be harder to clean around them. It’s best to get this step done ASAP.

3) Take inventory

When you’re packing, it’s a good idea to make a list of your boxes and their biggest contents. You shouldn’t list every item, but you should have a good sense of what you own.

Once your boxes arrive, check the list to see if anything’s missing. Again, this doesn’t mean going through every box. But if something is missing, then the sooner you notice it, the sooner you’re likely to get it back if you give the movers a call.

4) Unpack your most important items

If you’re a savvy packer, you should have a “Day One” box (or a few). Your Day One box contains contain the most important items you need: things like bedding, important paperwork, pillows, soap, a change of clothes, toilet paper, towels, and so forth.

This box won’t have everything you need (and it’s very likely you’ll forget at least some things while packing it). But it’ll make your first day in your new place more bearable, and minimize emergency trips to the store.

As you’re unloading and arranging boxes, take your Day One box and set it aside. Open it as soon as you get a chance, and set these items out where they’ll be easily accessible.

5) Get your bedroom and bathroom together

Cooking and hanging out in your living room are optional. But you’ll definitely need to sleep, shower, and use the bathroom on your first day.

Make sure the boxes for your bedroom and bathroom are clearly labeled. As soon as possible, start the work of getting these rooms together. It’s unlikely, this early, that everything will be in its final arrangement, but even if you have a few things ready you’ll feel far more at home in your new space.

6) Get to know your neighbors

You can technically put this step off, of course. But going out of your way to meet your new neighbors on your first day in your new house is a great way to start things off on the right foot.

Drop by and introduce yourself. Give them your contact information, and get theirs as well. While you’re at it, why not get some restaurant recommendations? Because soon, you’ll need to…

7) Have dinner

You need to eat, especially if you’re moving cleaning and moving heavy boxes. But chances are you won’t be ready to cook on your first day in your new home. Look up some restaurants locally, and either go out to eat or order in. To go the extra mile and get to know your neighborhood, stay away from chains and try to get food from somewhere with local charm.

8) Help your kids and pets settle in

Moves are stressful for both kids and pets. Go out of your way to check in on them and make sure you’re meeting their needs. Reassure your kids, and give them space to play and explore. Make sure your pets have plenty of food, water, and love during this transition.

Moving can be stressful for everybody, and because it’s logistically complicated, it’s easy to get distracted. By focusing on the important stuff first, familiarizing yourself with your new space, and ensuring everyone’s essential needs are met, you’ll be a step ahead of the game and ready to settle into your new space.

Let us Help!

Give us a call at 1 (800) 233-6683  or visit your local Massachusetts moving company to discuss hiring expert movers. Also, consider downloading our packing guide.

10 Tips for Moving to a New Neighborhood

Moving your family is stressful, no matter how far your old home is away from your new one. You have to pack up your possessions, bid friends goodbye, and often change schools and jobs. Becoming part of a new neighborhood takes some time, but you can speed up the process by being proactive and planning your integration into the new territory. While everyone’s experience is unique, experts agree on certain helpful steps to make you feel at home fast.

1. Professional Movers

Hiring professional movers can save your sanity and your dining room table. An experienced crew will perform much of the physical labor and protect your beloved possessions. While Uncle Jerry may have good intentions, your piano may not survive the back of his camper. Even with the help of professional movers, you’ll still have plenty to do, but professionals can significantly lessen your stress.

2. Research

Before the move, thoroughly research your new neighborhood. Learn everything you can about the schools and community organizations before you arrive. Create a list of local attractions and events that appeal to your family so you can begin to enjoy your new surroundings. You will have fun and quickly meet new people. The more you are out and about, the faster you become part of the neighborhood.

3. Introductions

In televisions shows, the people next door show up on your porch with a pot roast and offers to help you move in. In reality, they may hesitate to intrude, knowing that you are probably overwhelmed with the move. Plus, their own family life is probably busy. Instead of waiting for them to come over, you should make the first move. You may see them in the yard or when they are headed out to work. Don’t hesitate to pop over and introduce yourself. Asking a simple question about the local shops can break the ice.

4. Volunteer

Once you have unpacked and caught your breath, consider volunteering. You can choose a new cause or continue the type of work you were doing in your previous home. For instance, volunteer at the local hospital, join the neighborhood march against breast cancer or volunteer at a local food pantry. You will feel good about yourself and also meet like-minded people who will appreciate your commitment to your new community.

5. Carpool

Carpooling to work or school saves you transportation expenses and may also help you bond quickly with other local residents. Sharing coffee, family anecdotes and even work complaints can be the foundation of beautiful relationships.

6. Dine Out

Dining out in your new location is helpful in several ways. You have a reprieve from food preparation and clean up while getting a real sense of the neighborhood. People and places will soon become familiar, and your presence will be noted by the locals. You may soon become regulars at a few favorite restaurants.

7. HOA

You should get to know your Homeowners Association as soon as possible. Study their rules closely so that you don’t inadvertently violate them and cause hard feelings in the neighborhood. Keep your grass trimmed, attend the meetings and offer suggestions as time goes by. Your concern will be noted by your neighbors, who will see that you are responsible and committed to your new home.

8. Entertain

Entertaining your neighbors doesn’t require a formal dinner party. You can host a few people at a backyard barbecue or a movie night with little effort or expense. You should consider these invites as an investment in your home. When you cultivate cordial relationships in your neighborhood, you help to create a secure and happy environment for your family. You may receive some reciprocal invitations as well.

9. Education

If you take a class at the local community college or other educational organization, you will enrich your life and spend time with others who have some of the same interests. If you don’t want to go that route, sign up for an exercise or dance class. Join a gym. It’s important to your mental health that you interact with people in person. Studies show that doing so helps fight depression.

10. Religion

If you are religious, joining a neighborhood house of worship is one of the most effective ways to become part of the community. You will meet regularly with those that share your beliefs and participate in the many social occasions that come with being an active member. Your new worship family should help you feel welcome and at home. If you have children, a house of worship can offer them instant playmates, so they won’t feel as homesick for their old friends

Moving to a new home can be wonderful. You can ease the pain of moving by planning ahead, researching your new neighborhood and diving into community life once you arrive. While you may feel displaced and inclined to isolate, you shouldn’t. Grab the grill by the handles and get to know your neighbors. By this time next year, you can be a vital part of your new community.

Contact Us!

If you’re interested in getting help on moving day, contact Ayer Moving & Storage for a free estimate. We offer moving assistance with local, interstate and international moves. We also provide moving truck rentals, storage services, and packing help, so call today to let us know which services you need.

7 Moving Day Mistakes

Moving day can be stressful, but it doesn’t have to be! When you plan ahead and get the appropriate help, you’ll find that it goes more smoothly than you thought possible, allowing you to relax and enjoy your new home. If you want to start looking forward to the big day rather than dreading it, here are some common moving-day mistakes and how you can avoid them.

1. Sleeping In

Moving day is not the day to sleep late. Even if you’re not moving until the afternoon or evening, surely you can find something else that needs to be done. If you’re actually finished packing everything and have all your boxes ready to go, you can do a few laps around your house and you’ll likely find something you missed. It’s just best to go to bed early, get a good night’s sleep, and then wake up early so you feel ready for the big day. If you hired a moving company, you can likely expect a phone call at some point to give you an update on their estimated time of arrival, and you should be up and ready for that!

2. Waiting Until the Last Minute to Pack

Many people underestimate how much stuff they have, which means they also underestimate how much time it will take them to pack. You don’t want to still be packing after the movers arrive, so make sure you don’t save this task for the last minute. In fact, it’s usually best to start packing months before you move if possible, or at least weeks before. And you should be done a few days before moving day if you want to reduce your stress level. If you truly don’t have time to pack everything, or if you’re just now realizing how much work it’s going to take you, consider paying for packing services from movers in your area. The experts can often pack within hours, and you’re going to need this kind of hustle if you’ve waited until the last minute to pack.

3. Forgetting to Organize Your Boxes

Packing doesn’t mean just throwing your things into boxes willy-nilly. There’s a method to the madness, or at least there should be if you want to reduce your stress when you move out — and when you move in to your new home. The first step to keeping the boxes organized is to mark them with which room the items will go in. Then keep related boxes near each other. For example, all the boxes of kitchen items should be kept together during the move, so place them near each other to ensure anyone who moves them will keep them together. In addition, if the items inside are fragile and need to be handled with care, be sure to mark that on the box.

4. Deciding to Bring Everything You Own

If you pack your belongings yourself, you’ll probably be surprised by how many things you have that you never use or simply forgot about years ago. Ask yourself if you really need to be taking these belongings to your new home. Doing so could make your move take a little longer, so consider throwing them out or donating them to a charity before you move. At the very least, consider putting them in storage for now. This way, you avoid a common moving mistake and your move is easier, making it possible to get a fresh start at your new home.

5. Not Having the Moving Materials You Need

Don’t make the moving-day mistake of approaching moving day with only a few boxes and no markers or packing tape. Not having the moving-day essentials can make it harder than it has to be, or even delay your move entirely. If you have heavy furniture to move, make sure you have a dolly and the proper shoes to wear while moving it. If you hired movers, you won’t have to worry so much about these essentials, especially if they’re going to pack for you as well. In that case, you should still make sure you wear comfortable shoes to keep your feet safe and have some bottled water available to stay hydrated.

6. Packing Up Items You’ll Need on Moving Day

So, you’ve packed everything away and you feel very prepared to move. But what happens when you arrive at your new house and you need to brush your teeth or change your clothes? Digging through your boxes on moving day is probably the last thing you want to do. This is why you should pack a bag with the essentials you’ll need the first few days in your new home. These include toiletries, soap, medicine, a few changes of clothes, some snacks, toilet paper, phone charger and a flashlight.

7. Not Getting the Right Help on Moving Day

Not hiring movers means all the duties that come with moving day are on you, or maybe you and a few friends. If that doesn’t sound appealing, hire movers. But don’t choose just any movers. Look at reviews and ask your friends and family who they recommend. Keep in mind you deserve to get help from a company that will arrive on time on moving day, be careful with your belongings and have a respectful attitude from start to finish.

If you’re interested in getting help on moving day, contact Ayer Moving & Storage for a free estimate. We offer moving assistance with local, interstate and international moves. We also provide moving truck rentals, storage services, and packing help, so call today to let us know which services you need.

What Not to Pack When Moving

If you are planning to move, you may be overwhelmed with a lengthy to-do list. Pulling up roots in one community and relocating to another means changing relationships, neighborhoods, schools, and perhaps even a new job.

One of those major tasks on your list is packing. Whether you are downsizing, upsizing or starting a new life cross-country, you have a lot to consider when it comes to what items you will take with you.

To reduce the stress on yourself and your family, it is recommended you start packing early. This may seem like it will extend the process even longer, but in fact, starting early gives you time to think about what you plan to pack, sell, give away or throw out. Another tip: leave yourself a “sanctuary” that is packed last, so you can retain the creature comforts that help you get through your day-to-day life.

While you want to make the moving process as easy as possible, you must also take into account some important regulations. Movers cannot transport certain items due to their hazardous nature. In addition, some items are too precious to risk putting on the moving van lest they get lost. Here’s a bit of an idea of what not to pack when moving and how else you can handle them.

Dangerous or Flammable Goods

If you want to bring anything that is flammable, potentially explosive or corrosive, you may be out of luck. Movers are prohibited from transporting such materials because of their hazardous nature.

While some of the items that fall into this category are expected by most people, others may surprise you. As a rule of thumb, it is best to ask your moving company well in advance for a list of items for which you need to make other arrangements. Here are a few common examples:

  • Paint and paint thinners
  • Household chemicals
  • Automotive maintenance chemicals
  • Nail polish remover
  • Gasoline
  • Matches
  • Propane tanks and cylinders
  • Radio-pharmaceuticals (radioactive drugs)
  • Firearms
  • Fireworks

If you have these items, you have many options. Your neighbor may appreciate a gift of a spare tank of gas or extra cans of paint. Many of these dangerous items, although they cannot be moved, often are acceptable to pass on to others.

Contact your municipal waste or recycling council for tips on how to dispose of any chemicals or hazardous items. Often, there are strict rules around disposal and a specific methodology for doing so.

Perishable Food

here is another tough fact about moving: it takes a while! Even when everything runs smoothly, most people need several hours to load the truck, drive to the new home and unload the belongings. The sad truth is that perishable food will not last without spoiling. In the event of spillage, it can also damage your other household items.

Instead of planning to take the food with you, have a goodbye meal with what is left in your fridge. Give the excess to neighbors or, if possible, the local food bank. If you need to throw out any perishable food, check with your city about organic waste programs, especially if you cannot put food in with your regular garbage.

Plants and Flowers

Your favorite houseplant may not be a hazardous good, but many regions still have rules about what can cross state lines. This is a great question to ask your mover: can you trust your beloved rubber plant to go in the truck? Depending on where you are going and the projected length of the move, the movers may or may not recommend that you make other arrangements for your green-leafed items.

Personal Items for Health and Safety

During the move, you will not be able to pop in to retrieve an important item at a moment’s notice. Make a list of those things you must have on hand, especially in the event of traffic delays or other unexpected events. These may include medications, changes of clothing, toiletries and comfort items for small children.

Valuables and Heirlooms

Most moving companies are reputable and take great care of your household items. However, they do not want to put your precious valuables at risk any more than you do. Since you will not be riding in the moving van along with your packed boxes, consider whether you can take some items with you. Among these precious items you may want to keep safely are:

  • Jewelry
  • Cash
  • Collections
  • Personal papers
  • Identification and moving documents
  • Family photos

If you are not sure what you need to keep near you, ask yourself if an item is replaceable. If it is not, do not pack it, regardless of the trust you have in your moving team to get the job done efficiently.

Contact Us!

In any moving experience, unexpected issues arise.  If you are not sure about a particular item, just ask us. We can help make your moving day is as stress-free as possible. Give us a call at 1-800-233-MOVE or email [email protected]

How to Prepare for a Military Family Move

9 Things to Remember When Preparing for a Military Family Move

Have you received military orders in a new host country? You may be full of excitement, but don’t let the big move cause extra stress. Here’s a checklist of essentials to remember throughout your move.

1. Keep All Your Legal Documents and Receipts in One Binder

There will be a lot of expenses during your move. To ensure you can get reimbursed properly, keep all your receipts in one folder. Other documents, such as your family’s passports, children’s medical records, and immunization documents should all be stored safely. You should also store transportation tickets (airline, train or boat) in this folder. Your marriage license and your children’s birth certificates are essential. Never let them get lost!

2. Apply for Passports and Visas

Your passport may be in order, but what about your spouse’s and children’s? If you do have a holiday while you are stationed in another country, you may want to do some sightseeing in another country besides your host country. This could be a great travel and learning experience for your kids. So make sure that both your government passports and your personal passports are in order. Start working on your area clearances and visa process, if necessary.

3. Decide If You Want to Live Off-post or On-post

This depends on your family’s needs. Do you want to be in a community with other military families, or would you rather live more like the locals? This is an important decision, as it affects your children and family members. Get clear on your personal choices and reasons for doing so.

4. Do a Household Inventory

In reality, you will not be able to ship all your possessions to your new destination. How much you are allowed to bring depends on your rank and length of service. Hiring a reliable moving company and packing services can ensure that you are able to bring the most necessary items. Whatever you have to leave, make an inventory. This way, you know whether or not to buy that item in the future. You can also arrange to take valuable items to trusted family members who can store them for you. Find out whether your service can handle some of the storage and moving fees.

5. Define Your Packing Strategy

Packing professionals say it’s important to pack in a systematic, organized way. You may have to move your possessions in several batches. Some items will not be necessary to have on hand immediately. These include the following:

  • Unaccompanied baggage — shipments that can arrive after you do (such as sports equipment or non-seasonal clothing)
  • Household goods — if shipped by sea, household goods (such as an extra cutlery set, for example) will take a few weeks to arrive

6. Make a Realistic Plan for Your Pets

If none of your family members or friends can take care of your pets for you while you’re away, you need to find other solutions. For example, local non-profits or organizations can help you find volunteer host families for your household pets. Communicate with your moving truck rental company if you need help in shipping your furry friends somewhere. Getting professional help is essential in reducing moving-related stress for you and your family. If you have young children, leaving their pets can be very emotional, so be patient and understanding during this time.

7. Review Your Home Insurance Policy

Unless you are renting a home, you want to have a good home insurance policy set up before you leave. Under the US Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act, it is your legal right to terminate a lease upon PCS orders. Just make sure you have the necessary documents printed out to show your landlord. If you own your home and decide to rent it out, go through a property contractor or real estate agent who can help you lease to good and trustworthy tenants.

8. Make a Plan for Your Vehicle

It may be possible for your family to get coverage for shipping your vehicle. Find out if the military will cover the expense of shipping your vehicle overseas. It may come in handy and save you lots of dollars in your host country.

9. Assign a Contact Person in Your Home Country to Handle Legal Documents and Proceedings

No matter how long you are going to be stationed overseas — whether a few months or a few years — you need to have a contact person in your home country. They could be a trusted family member or friend. They can help you with arranging shipping or other legal requirements. If anyone needs to contact you, they can go through your contact person, to relay news or messages.

Need to avail of the best packing, moving, storage and truck rental services for your military family move? Ayer Moving does it all. Contact us today for more information.

5 Tips to Make Moving a Breeze

Anyone who has ever thought that moving would be easy was unfortunately quite misled. But that doesn’t mean that there aren’t things that can make your move faster and less stressful. Here are five tips to help make your move go as smoothly as possible.

 

Do your research

Finding your new place and putting your current one on the market isn’t the only research you need to do for a move. You should also be researching as many tips as you can to make your move as easy as possible. Look up the specific items you’re more worried about to give you some comfort in knowing how to best move them and if you realize you have too much and are worried about it all breaking start looking into some professionals. You need to decide if you’re going to be borrowing a friend truck, rent a moving truck or if you want to go the way of hiring a professional moving company. All of this will take research but it will be well worth it come moving day.

 

Make a list/schedule

Lists are going to be your best friend during your move. Make lists for each room. Make lists every time you think of something you might forget.  Not only will this ease any tensions you have about forgetting but you won’t have to worry as much when it comes to packing directly because you’ll know everything that needs to be packed.

 

It is also helpful to make a schedule of when you’re going to pack what, what days you need to call which companies, and of course when the moving truck will get here. Write down when things like your refrigerator need to be unplugged because it’ll take time to dry or when to fill holes made by your paintings because it may need to settle.It’ll stop you from getting in a panic as the day gets closer because everything will already be planned out.

 

Declutter, declutter, declutter

It can’t be said enough. Decluttering will be your best friend when it comes to packing and moving day. Go through every room and every storage space once, twice, and even three times to make sure that you have gotten rid of everything you don’t need and that everything you still have you absolutely do. Not only will it lessen your load but you won’t have any regret when it comes to packing and you realize you still have so much stuff you don’t need and should have sold or donated.

 

Prepare for moving in as well

Your move doesn’t end when the truck closes. You need to make sure that everything you’ll need on arrival is accessible. Pack yourself a bag of clothes and the essentials like toothbrushes or shampoo, your laptop, snacks, anything you’ll need if you have a pet. You’ll also want to a pack another bag, either to keep with you or keep where it can be easily unloaded full of other items you might need. You should pack sheets and maybe some simple kitchen supplies like a few plates and cooking supplies. You may even want to include some cleaning supplies so that you can keep your house clean of anything that might come with moving in.

 

Go with the Flow

Unrealistic expectations of a smooth and worry free move are only going to make you more stressed as it gets closer to moving day. Expect that disaster may strike or that that everything is going to be a mess and take all the necessary steps to eliminate conflict. Figure out everything that you have to and when you have to do it by. Get everything packed up and organized and even when your house is a mess just think that that is how it is supposed to look at this point. Eliminating any high expectations will help to keep your stress level low and keep you prepared.

 

Need More Help?

You can reach us at 1 (800) 233-6683 or visit your local Massachusetts moving company to learn more about what we can do to help you. Download the Ayer Moving Guide for a Stress-Free Move!